Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author: Daniel Cipriani x
  • Athletic Training, Therapy, and Rehabilitation x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Brian Campbell, James Yaggie and Daniel Cipriani

Context:

Functional knee braces (FKB) are used prophylactically and in rehabilitation to aide in the functional stability of the knee.

Objective:

To determine if alterations in select lower extremity moments persist throughout a one hour period in healthy individuals.

Design:

2X5 repeated measures design.

Setting:

Biomechanics Laboratory.

Subjects:

Twenty subjects (14 male and 6 female, mean age 26.5±7 yrs; height 172.4±13 cm; weight 78.6±9 kg), separated into braced (B) and no brace (NB) groups.

Intervention:

A one-hour exercise program divided into three 20 minute increments.

Main Outcome Measures:

Synchronized three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected at 20-minute increments to assess the effect of the FKB on select lower extremity moments and vertical ground reaction forces.

Results:

Increase in hip moment and a decrease in knee moment were noted immediately after brace application and appeared to persist throughout a one hour bout of exercise.

Conclusions:

The FKB and the exercise intervention caused decreases in knee joint moments and increases in hip joint moments.

Restricted access

Birgit Unfried, Arnel Aguinaldo and Daniel Cipriani

Running on a road for fitness, sport, or recreation poses unique challenges to the runner, one of which is the camber of the surface. Few studies have examined the effects of camber on running, namely, kinematic studies of the knee and ankle. There is currently no information available regarding muscle response to running on a cambered road surface. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a cambered road on lower extremity muscle activity, as measured by electromyography in recreational runners. In addition, this study examined a true outdoor road surface, as opposed to a treadmill surface. The mean muscle activity of the tibialis anterior, lateral gastrocnemius, vastus medialis oblique, biceps femoris, and gluteus medius were studied. Fifteen runners completed multiple running trials on cambered and level surfaces. During the stance phase, mean activities of tibialis anterior, lateral gastrocnemius, and vastus medialis oblique were greater on the gutter side than the crown side. There were no differences in mean muscle activity during the swing phase. The findings of this study suggest that running on a road camber alters the activity of select lower extremity muscles possibly in response to lower extremity compensations to the cambered condition.

Restricted access

Joseph S. Parry, Rachel Straub and Daniel J. Cipriani

Context:

The Bodyblade Pro is used for shoulder rehabilitation after injury. Resistance is provided by blade oscillations—faster oscillations or higher speeds correspond to greater resistance. However, research supporting the Bodyblade Pro’s use is scarce, particularly in comparison with dumbbell training.

Objective:

To compare muscle activity, using electromyography (EMG), in the back and shoulder regions during shoulder exercises with the Bodyblade Pro vs dumbbells.

Design:

Randomized crossover study.

Setting:

San Diego State University biomechanics laboratory.

Participants:

11 healthy male subjects age 19–32 y.

Intervention:

Subjects performed shoulder-flexion and -abduction exercises using a Bodyblade Pro and dumbbells (5, 8, and 10 lb) while EMG recorded activity of the deltoid, pectoralis major, infraspinatus, serratus anterior, and erector spinae.

Main Outcome Measures:

Average peak muscle activity (% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was separately measured for shoulder abduction and flexion in the range of 85° to 95°. Differences among exercise devices were separately analyzed for the flexed and abducted positions using 1-way repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results:

The Bodyblade Pro produced greater muscle activity than all the dumbbell trials. Differences were significant for all muscles measured (all P < .01) except for the erector spinae during shoulder flexion with a 10-lb dumbbell. EMG activity for the Bodyblade Pro exceeded 50% of the MVIC during both shoulder flexion and abduction. For the dumbbell conditions, only the 10-lb trials approached this effect.

Conclusions:

Using a Bodyblade during shoulder exercises results in greater shoulder- and back-muscle recruitment than dumbbells. The Bodyblade Pro can activate multiple muscles in a single exercise and thereby minimize the need for multiple dumbbell exercises. The Bodyblade Pro is an effective device for shoulder- and back-muscle activation that warrants further use by clinicians interested in its use for rehabilitation.