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  • Author: Edgar R. Vieira x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
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Sabrine N. Costa, Edgar R. Vieira and Paulo C. B. Bento

The aims of this study were to compare the effects of a multicomponent exercise program provided at a center (CB) versus done part at home and part at a center (H+CB) on frailty status, strength, physical function, and gait of prefrail older women. Twenty-five women were randomly allocated into the CB (n = 14; 69 ± 6 years) and the H+CB (n = 11; 69 ± 7 years) groups. Both groups completed an exercise program including strengthening, balance, and gait exercises. The program was 12 weeks long, done three times per week, for 60 min per session. Frailty, knee and hip muscle strength, spatiotemporal parameters of the usual and maximum speed dual-task gait, and physical function were assessed at baseline and after program completion. The exercise program reversed the prefrail status of most participants independently of the mode of delivery. Strength increased in both groups, but the CB group had more pronounced improvements in gait and physical function. H+CB exercise programs are good options for prefrail older women.

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Edgar R. Vieira, Ruth Tappen, Sareen S. Gropper, Maria T. Severi, Gabriella Engstrom, Marcio R. de Oliveira, Alexandre C. Barbosa and Rubens A. da Silva

The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate a 6-month exercise program completed by 10 older Caribbean Americans. Assessments were done at baseline and 3 and 6 months, and included walks on an instrumented mat at preferred speed, and during street crossing simulations with regular (10 s) and reduced time (5 s). There were no significant differences on preferred walking speed over time. Differences between the street crossing conditions were found only at 6 months. Significant changes over time among the assessments were found only during street crossing with reduced time. Street crossing with reduced time was the only walking condition sensitive to capture changes associated with participating in the exercise program. There was a significant increase in dorsiflexion strength overtime. At 6 months it was significantly higher than at baseline and 3 months. The program was feasible, acceptable, and had some positive effects on walking, knee flexion, and dorsiflexion strength.