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  • Author: Edward J. Zambraski x
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Samuel N. Cheuvront, Robert W. Kenefick and Edward J. Zambraski

A common practice in sports science is to assess hydration status using the concentration of a single spot urine collection taken at any time of day for comparison against concentration (specific gravity, osmolality, color) thresholds established from first morning voids. There is strong evidence that this practice can be confounded by fluid intake, diet, and exercise, among other factors, leading to false positive/negative assessments. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to provide a simple explanation as to why this practice leads to erroneous conclusions and should be curtailed in favor of consensus hydration assessment recommendations.

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Kevin S. O’Fallon, Diksha Kaushik, Bozena Michniak-Kohn, C. Patrick Dunne, Edward J. Zambraski and Priscilla M. Clarkson

The flavonoid quercetin is purported to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study examined if quercetin supplementation attenuates indicators of exercise-induced muscle damage in a doubleblind laboratory study. Thirty healthy subjects were randomized to quercetin (QU) or placebo (PL) supplementation and performed 2 separate sessions of 24 eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Muscle strength, soreness, resting arm angle, upper arm swelling, serum creatine kinase (CK) activity, plasma quercetin (PQ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed before and for 5 d after exercise. Subjects then ingested nutrition bars containing 1,000 mg/d QU or PL for 7 d before and 5 d after the second exercise session, using the opposite arm. PQ reached 202 ± 52 ng/ml after 7 d of supplementation and remained elevated during the 5-d postexercise recovery period (p < .05). Subjects experienced strength loss (peak = 47%), muscle soreness (peak = 39 ± 6 mm), reduced arm angle (–7° ± 1°), CK elevations (peak = 3,307 ± 1,481 U/L), and arm swelling (peak = 11 ± 2 mm; p < .0001), indicating muscle damage and inflammation; however, differences between treatments were not detected. Eccentric exercise did not alter plasma IL-6 (peak = 1.9 pg/ml) or CRP (peak = 1.6 mg/L) relative to baseline or by treatment. QU supplementation had no effect on markers of muscle damage or inflammation after eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors.