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  • Author: Guy Faulkner x
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Fiona J. Moola, Guy E.J. Faulkner and Jane E. Schneiderman

Although physical activity may reduce lung function decline in youth with cystic fibrosis (CF), most patients are inactive. Little is known about why youth with CF are inactive or how to facilitate physical activity. This study explored perceptions toward physical activity in 14 youth with CF at a Canadian Hospital. Qualitative interviews were conducted and a grounded theory analysis was undertaken. The participants demonstrated positive or negative perceptions toward physical activity and different experiences—such as parental support and illness narratives—influenced youths’ perceptions. In addition, the participants experienced physical activity within the context of reduced time. Recommendations for developing physical activity interventions, including the particular need to ensure that such interventions are not perceived as wasteful of time, are provided.

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Lauren Handler, Emily M. Tennant, Guy Faulkner and Amy E. Latimer-Cheung

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth (age 5–17 yr) consolidate evidence-informed daily requirements for physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep into 1 comprehensive resource. The primary objective of this study was to explore how parents of children and youth with disabilities (CYWD) perceive the guidelines. The secondary objective was to explore whether parents consider the guideline branding to be inclusive. A total of 15 mothers of CYWD participated in one 60-min semistructured interview, either in person or by telephone. The diffusion-of-innovation theory provided a theoretical basis for the interview guide. Mothers’ perspectives of the guidelines and branding are represented as seven themes. The results indicate that the guidelines and the branding are not inclusive or compatible with the abilities and needs of CYWD. Findings from this study provide a foundation for ongoing knowledge-translation activities aiming to address these limitations. Further revisions are necessary to promote full inclusion and uptake of the guidelines among CYWD.

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Fiona Moola, Guy E.J. Faulkner, Joel A. Kirsh and Jennifer Kilburn

This study explored perceptions toward physical activity and sport in the lives of youth with congenital heart disease. Thirteen cardiac participants were interviewed in the presence of their parents, and a process of inductive analysis was conducted. Sport was not considered a valued pursuit despite the belief that it is essential for the attainment of good health. Low-self efficacy and fatigue were influenced by covert fears and exclusion and further decreased the value ascribed to sport and physical activity. Nontraditional activities, support from others, and perceptions of mastery played a crucial role in enabling participation and facilitated the journey toward recovery. Findings are discussed within the context of self-efficacy theory and may inform the design of safe and enjoyable physical activity opportunities for this population.

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner and F. Virginia Wright

The objective of this study was to comprehensively evaluate inclusive out-of-school time physical activity programs for children/youth with physical disabilities. A search of the published literature was conducted and augmented by international expertise. A quality appraisal was conducted; only studies with quality ratings ≥60% informed our best practice recommendations. Seventeen studies were included using qualitative (n = 9), quantitative (n = 5), or mixed (n = 3) designs. Programs had a diversity of age groups, group sizes, and durations. Most programs were recreational level, involving both genders. Rehabilitation staff were the most common leaders. Outcomes focused on social skills/relationships, physical skill development, and psychological well-being, with overall positive effects shown in these areas. The best practice recommendations are consistent with an abilities-based approach emphasizing common group goals and interests; cooperative activities; mastery-oriented, individualized instruction; and developmentally appropriate, challenging activities. Results indicate that inclusive out-of-school time physical activity programs are important for positive psychosocial and physical skill development of children/youth with physical disabilities.