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  • Author: J. Troy Blackburn x
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Derek N. Pamukoff and J. Troy Blackburn

Greater lower extremity joint stiffness may be related to the development of tibial stress fractures in runners. Musculotendinous stiffness is the largest contributor to joint stiffness, but it is unclear what factors contribute to musculotendinous stiffness. The purpose of this study was to compare plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness, architecture, geometry, and Achilles tendon stiffness between male runners with and without a history of tibial stress fracture. Nineteen healthy runners (age = 21 ± 2.7 years; mass = 68.2 ± 9.3 kg; height = 177.3 ± 6.0 cm) and 19 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture (age = 21 ± 2.9 years; mass = 65.3 ± 6.0 kg; height = 177.2 ± 5.2 cm) were recruited from community running groups and the university’s varsity and club cross-country teams. Plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness was estimated from the damped frequency of oscillatory motion about the ankle follow perturbation. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure architecture and geometry of the medial gastrocnemius. Dependent variables were compared between groups via one-way ANOVAs. Previously injured runners had greater plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness (P < .001), greater Achilles tendon stiffness (P = .004), and lesser Achilles tendon elongation (P = .003) during maximal isometric contraction compared with healthy runners. No differences were found in muscle thickness, pennation angle, or fascicle length.

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Derek N. Pamukoff, Sarah E. Bell, Eric D. Ryan and J. Troy Blackburn

Context:

Hamstring musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) is associated with lower-extremity injury risk (ie, hamstring strain, anterior cruciate ligament injury) and is commonly assessed using the damped oscillatory technique. However, despite a preponderance of studies that measure MTS reliably in laboratory settings, there are no valid clinical measurement tools. A valid clinical measurement technique is needed to assess MTS and permit identification of individuals at heightened risk of injury and track rehabilitation progress.

Objective:

To determine the validity and reliability of the Myotonometer for measuring active hamstring MTS.

Design:

Descriptive laboratory study.

Setting:

Laboratory

Participants:

33 healthy participants (15 men, age 21.33 ± 2.94 y, height 172.03 ± 16.36 cm, mass 74.21 ± 16.36 kg).

Main Outcome Measures:

Hamstring MTS was assessed using the damped oscillatory technique and the Myotonometer. Intraclass correlations were used to determine the intrasession, intersession, and interrater reliability of the Myotonometer. Criterion validity was assessed via Pearson product–moment correlation between MTS measures obtained from the Myotonometer and from the damped oscillatory technique.

Results:

The Myotonometer demonstrated good intrasession (ICC3,1 = .807) and interrater reliability (ICC2,k = .830) and moderate intersession reliability (ICC2,k = .693). However, it did not provide a valid measurement of MTS compared with the damped oscillatory technique (r = .346, P = .061).

Conclusions:

The Myotonometer does not provide a valid measure of active hamstring MTS. Although the Myotonometer does not measure active MTS, it possesses good reliability and portability and could be used clinically to measure tissue compliance, muscle tone, or spasticity associated with multiple musculoskeletal disorders. Future research should focus on portable and clinically applicable tools to measure active hamstring MTS in efforts to prevent and monitor injuries.

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Darin A. Padua and J. Troy Blackburn

Column-editor : Thomas W. Kaminski

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Timothy C. Mauntel, Barnett S. Frank, Rebecca L. Begalle, J. Troy Blackburn and Darin A. Padua

A greater knee valgus angle is a risk factor for lower extremity injuries. Visually observed medial knee displacement is used as a proxy for knee valgus motion during movement assessments in an attempt to identify individuals at heightened risk for injury. The validity of medial knee displacement as an indicator of valgus motion has yet to be determined during a single-leg squat. This study compared three-dimensional knee and hip angles between participants who displayed medial knee displacement (MKD group) during a single-leg squat and those who did not (control group). Participants completed five single-leg squats. An electromagnetic motion tracking system was used to quantify peak knee and hip joint angles during the descent phase of each squat. MANOVA identified a difference between the MKD and control group kinematics. ANOVA post hoc testing revealed greater knee valgus angle in the MKD (12.86 ± 5.76) compared with the control (6.08 ± 5.23) group. There were no other differences between groups. Medial knee displacement is indicative of knee valgus motion; however, it is not indicative of greater knee or hip rotation, or hip adduction. These data indicate that clinicians can accurately identify individuals with greater knee valgus angle through visually observed medial knee displacement.

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Sean A. Jones, Derek N. Pamukoff, Timothy C. Mauntel, J. Troy Blackburn and Joseph B. Myers

Context: Verbal and tactile feedback (VTF) during rehabilitation exercises can increase muscle activation, thus improving the therapeutic benefits. However, it is unclear which feedback method elicits the greatest electromyographic (EMG) amplitude. Objective: To determine if the addition of tactile to verbal feedback (VF) increases EMG amplitude of selected shoulder musculature during scapular plane elevation (Ys), shoulder horizontal abduction with external rotation (Ts), and scapular retraction with external rotation (Ws). Design: Repeated-measures cross-over design. Setting: Biomechanics laboratory. Participants: A total of 30 physically active adults volunteered for this study—age = 20.23 (1.25) years; height = 1.71 (0.073) m; and mass = 70.11 (15.14) kg. Interventions: Electromyography of the serratus anterior; upper, middle, and lower trapezii; and anterior and posterior deltoids was recorded during Ys, Ts, and Ws with VTF and VF alone during separate testing sessions. Participants completed baseline trials without feedback, then received VTF and VF across 2 counterbalanced sessions. Main Outcome Measures: Difference scores were calculated between prefeedback and postfeedback interventions, and the difference score between baseline measurements was used as a control. One-way analysis of variance of the difference scores was used to evaluate the influence of VTF and VF on EMG amplitude during Ys, Ts, and Ws. Results: There was a significant difference between conditions for EMG amplitude of the middle trapezius (F 2,28 = 4.09, P = .02) and serratus anterior (F 2,28 = 3.91, P = .03) during Ys, the middle trapezius (F 2,28 = 7.82, P = .001) during Ws, and the upper (F 2,28 = 3.61, P = .03) and middle trapezii (F 2,28 = 5.81, P = .01) during Ts. Post hoc testing revealed that both feedback conditions elicited greater EMG amplitude compared with no feedback, but there were no significant differences between the feedback conditions. Conclusions: The addition of tactile feedback to VF does not increase EMG amplitude compared with VF alone. This study indicates that feedback, regardless of type, is more beneficial than providing no feedback, for increasing EMG amplitude.

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Michelle Boling, Darin Padua, J. Troy Blackburn, Meredith Petschauer and Christopher Hirth

Context:

Clinicians commonly attempt to facilitate vastus medialis oblique (VMO) activity by instructing patients to squeeze a ball between their knees during squatting exercises.

Objective:

To determine whether VMO activation amplitude and the VMO to vastus lateralis (VL) activation ratio (VMO:VL) were altered when performing active hip adduction during a dynamic squat exercise.

Design:

Single test session.

Participants:

Fifteen healthy subjects, with no history of knee pain, volunteered for this study.

Intervention:

Surface EMG of the VMO, VL, and hip adductor (ADD) muscles were recorded while subjects performed 10 consecutive squats against their body weight through a range of 0° to 90° of knee flexion. Subjects performed the squat exercises during two different conditions: (1) active hip adduction and (2) no hip adduction.

Main Outcome Measures:

Average VMO EMG amplitude and VMO:VL ratio were determined during the knee flexion (0° to 90°) and knee extension (90° to 0°) phases of the squat exercise.

Results:

Active hip adduction did not significantly change VMO amplitude or VMO:VL ratio during the knee flexion or knee extension phases of the dynamic squat exercise.

Conclusions:

Based on these results, we conclude that VMO amplitude and the VMO: VL ratio are not influenced by performing active hip adduction during a dynamic squat exercise in healthy subjects.

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Jonathan S. Goodwin, Robert A. Creighton, Brian G. Pietrosimone, Jeffery T. Spang and J. Troy Blackburn

Context: Orthotic devices such as medial unloader knee braces and lateral heel wedges may limit cartilage loading following trauma or surgical repair. However, little is known regarding their effects on gait biomechanics in young, healthy individuals who are at risk of cartilage injury during physical activity due to greater athletic exposure compared with older adults. Objective: Determine the effect of medial unloader braces and lateral heel wedges on lower-extremity kinematics and kinetics in healthy, young adults. Design: Cross-sectional crossover design. Setting: Laboratory setting. Patients: Healthy, young adults who were recreationally active (30 min/d for 3 d/wk) between 18 and 35 years of age, who were free from orthopedic injury for at least 6 months, and with no history of lower-extremity orthopedic surgery. Interventions: All subjects completed normal over ground walking with a medial unloader brace at 2 different tension settings and a lateral heel wedge for a total of 4 separate walking conditions. Main Outcome Measures: Frontal plane knee angle at heel strike, peak varus angle, peak internal knee valgus moment, and frontal plane angular impulse were compared across conditions. Results: The medial unloader brace at 50% (−2.04° [3.53°]) and 100% (−1.80° [3.63°]) maximum load placed the knee in a significantly more valgus orientation at heel strike compared with the lateral heel wedge condition (−0.05° [2.85°]). However, this difference has minimal clinical relevance. Neither of the orthotic devices altered knee kinematics or kinetics relative to the control condition. Conclusions: Although effective in older adults and individuals with varus knee alignment, medial unloader braces and lateral heel wedges do not influence gait biomechanics in young, healthy individuals.

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David R. Bell, Megan P. Myrick, J. Troy Blackburn, Sandra J. Shultz, Kevin M. Guskiewicz and Darin A. Padua

Context:

Preventing noncontact ACL injuries has been a major focus of athletic trainers and researchers. One factor that may influence female noncontact ACL injury is the fluctuating concentrations of hormones in the body.

Objective:

To determine whether muscle properties change across the menstrual cycle.

Design:

Repeated measures. Testing was performed within 3 d after the onset of menses and ovulation. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to determine changes in variables across the menstrual cycle, and Pearson correlations were used to determine relationships between variables.

Participants:

8 women with normal menstrual cycles.

Main Outcome Measures:

Active hamstring stiffness and hamstring extensibility.

Results:

Hamstring extensibility (P = .003) increased at the ovulation testing session but hamstring muscle stiffness (P = .66) did not.

Conclusions:

The results indicate that hamstring muscle stiffness did not change across the menstrual cycle and hamstring extensibility increased at ovulation, when estrogen concentration increases.

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Rebecca L. Begalle, Meghan C. Walsh, Melanie L. McGrath, Michelle C. Boling, J. Troy Blackburn and Darin A. Padua

The ankle, knee, and hip joints work together in the sagittal plane to absorb landing forces. Reduced sagittal plane motion at the ankle may alter landing strategies at the knee and hip, potentially increasing injury risk; however, no studies have examined the kinematic relationships between the joints during jump landings. Healthy adults (N = 30; 15 male, 15 female) performed jump landings onto a force plate while three-dimensional kinematic data were collected. Joint displacement values were calculated during the loading phase as the difference between peak and initial contact angles. No relationship existed between ankle dorsiflexion displacement during landing and three-dimensional knee and hip displacements. However, less ankle dorsiflexion displacement was associated with landing at initial ground contact with larger hip flexion, hip internal rotation, knee flexion, knee varus, and smaller plantar flexion angles. Findings of the current study suggest that restrictions in ankle motion during landing may contribute to contacting the ground in a more flexed position but continuing through little additional motion to absorb the landing. Transverse plane hip and frontal plane knee positioning may also occur, which are known to increase the risk of lower extremity injury.