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  • Author: Jeffrey L. Stinson x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
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Liz Wanless and Jeffrey L. Stinson

While managing the intercollegiate athletic development office is critical to contributions generation, the nearly 40 years of research modeling intercollegiate athletic fundraising emphasized limited factors external to this department. Both theoretical and statistical justification warrants a broader scope in contemporary factor identification. With a resource-based view as the theoretical foundation, a list of 43 variables both internal and external to the intercollegiate athletic development office was generated through an extensive literature review and semistructured interviews with athletic and nonathletic fundraising professionals. Based on the factors identified, random and fixed effects regression models were developed via test statistic model reduction across a 5-year panel (FY2011–FY2015). Ninety-three schools were included, representing 73% of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) membership (85% of public FBS institutions). The results highlight the role of both internal and external factors in explaining intercollegiate athletic fundraising procurement.

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Jeffrey L. Stinson and Dennis R. Howard

As both academic and athletic programs have become increasingly reliant on private support, the relationship between academic and athletic fund-raising has drawn increased research attention. The current study seeks to clarify the disparate findings of previous research by using the Voluntary Support of Education database of private support to colleges and universities to examine giving by alumni and nonalumni to academic and athletic programs at institutions participating in NCAA Division I-A football. Linear mixed-model analyses revealed the moderating role of academic reputation on institutional giving. Total giving to schools with the strongest academic reputations was less susceptible to the changing fortunes of athletic teams than total giving to institutions not included in the top tier of academically ranked schools. Although the top-ranked schools appeared immune to the influence of athletic performance, analysis of allocation patterns indicated that an increasing percentage of total dollars donated was directed to athletic programs at all levels of schools.