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  • Author: Robert Ross x
  • Athletic Training, Therapy, and Rehabilitation x
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Ross H. Sanders, Barry D. Wilson and Robert K. Jensen

This study investigated whether force data could be derived accurately using segment inertia data determined by the elliptical zone method (Jensen, 1976), automatic digitizing from high-speed video using a Motion Analysis VP110 system, and for an activity that does not require flexion of the thorax. The criterion fonctions were the force-time records of the jumps recorded at 500 Hz by a Kistler 9281B force platform. A second-order Butterworth digital filter was used to smooth the derived data, with frequency cutoffs being selected on the basis of root mean square error of the smoothed function with respect to the criterion force function. In a second procedure, the criterion function was the directly measured force-time record after filtering with a second-order Butterworth digital filter at 5 Hz to remove the high frequency part of the force signal. The closeness of fit of the derived data to the low frequency part of the criterion force was then assessed. It was concluded that, using the techniques described, the low frequency components of the ground reaction forces of drop jumps could be derived accurately.

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Scott Ross, Kevin Guskiewicz, William Prentice, Robert Schneider and Bing Yu

Objective:

T o determine differences between contralateral limbs’ strength, proprio-ception, and kinetic and knee-kinematic variables during single-limb landing.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Subjects:

30.

Measurements:

Hip, knee, and foot isokinetic peak torques; anterior/posterior (AP) and medial/lateral (ML) sway displacements during a balance task; and stabilization times, vertical ground-reaction force (VGRF), time to peak VGRF, and knee-flexion range of motion (ROM) from initial foot contact to peak VGRF during single-limb landing.

Results:

The kicking limb had significantly greater values for knee-extension (P = .008) and -flexion (P = .047) peak torques, AP sway displacement (P = .010), knee-flexion ROM from initial foot contact to peak VGRF (P < .001), and time to peak VGRF (P = .004). No other dependent measures were significantly different between limbs (P > .05).

Conclusion:

The kicking limb had superior thigh strength, better proprioception, and greater knee-flexion ROM than the stance limb.

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Robert S. Thiebaud, Takashi Abe, Jeremy P. Loenneke, Tyler Garcia, Yohan Shirazi and Ross McArthur

Context: Blood flow restriction (BFR) increases muscle size and strength when combined with low loads, but various methods are used to produce this stimulus. It is unclear how using elastic knee wraps can impact acute muscular responses compared with using nylon cuffs, where the pressure can be standardized. Objective: Investigate how elastic knee wraps compare with nylon cuffs and high-load (HL)/low-load (LL) resistance exercise. Design: A randomized cross-over experimental design using 6 conditions combined with unilateral knee extension. Setting: Human Performance Laboratory. Participants: A total of 9 healthy participants (males = 7 and females = 2) and had an average age of 22 (4) years. Intervention: LL (30% of 1-repetition maximum [1-RM]), HL (70% 1-RM), BFR at 40% of arterial occlusion pressure (BFR-LOW), BFR at 80% of arterial occlusion pressure (BFR-HIGH), elastic knee wraps stretched by 2 in (PRACTICAL-LOW), and elastic knee wraps stretched to a new length equivalent to 85% of thigh circumference (PRACTICAL-HIGH). BFR and practical conditions used 30% 1-RM. Main Outcome Measures: Muscle thickness, maximum voluntary isometric contraction, and electromyography amplitude. Bayesian statistics evaluated differences in changes between conditions using the Bayes factor (BF10), and median and 95% credible intervals were reported from the posterior distribution. Results: Total repetitions completed were greater for BFR-LOW versus PRACTICAL-HIGH (BF10 = 3.2, 48.6 vs 44 repetitions) and greater for PRACTICAL-LOW versus BFR-HIGH (BF10 = 717, 51.8 vs 36.3 repetitions). Greater decreases in changes in maximum voluntary isometric contraction were found in PRACTICAL-HIGH versus HL (BF10 = 1035, ∼103 N) and LL (BF10 = 45, ∼66 N). No differences in changes in muscle thickness were found between LL versus PRACTICAL-LOW/PRACTICAL-HIGH conditions (BF10 = 0.32). Greater changes in electromyography amplitude were also found for BFR-LOW versus PRACTICAL-HIGH condition (BF10 = 6.13, ∼12%), but no differences were noted between the other BFR conditions. Conclusions: Overall, elastic knee wraps produce a more fatiguing stimulus than LL or HL conditions and might be used as an alternative to pneumatic cuffs that are traditionally used for BFR exercise.