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  • Author: Rosenda Murillo x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
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Rosenda Murillo, Maya J. Lambiase, Bonny J. Rockette-Wagner, Andrea M. Kriska, Jeffrey P. Haibach and Rebecca C. Thurston

Background:

This study examined associations between physical activity (recreational, nonrecreational) and sleep duration among a nationally representative diverse sample of U.S. adults.

Methods:

We used cross-sectional data from 9,205 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007 to 2012 participants aged 20 to 65 years who identified as White, Black, or Hispanic. Activity (ie, recreation, occupation, and transportation activity) was categorized into quartiles. Sleep duration was categorized as short (≤6 hours/night) or normal (>6 to ≤9 hours/night). Logistic regression was used to estimate associations of activity with sleep duration.

Results:

Recommended levels of recreation activity and moderate levels of transportation activity were associated with normal sleep duration [Odds Ratio (OR): = 1.33, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.08, 1.65; OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.62, respectively]. High occupation physical activity was associated with shorter sleep duration (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.71). Differences were observed by race/ethnicity in associations of recreation and occupation activity with sleep duration.

Conclusions:

White individuals who engaged in some recreation activity, relative to being inactive, had more favorable sleep duration; whereas, high levels of occupation activity were associated with worse sleep duration among White and Black individuals. Physical activity was not associated with sleep duration among Hispanics.

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Elizabeth Vásquez, Garrett Strizich, Linda Gallo, Simon J. Marshall, Gina C. Merchant, Rosenda Murillo, Frank J. Penedo, Christian Salazar, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Benjamin A. Shaw and Carmen R. Isasi

Background:

Chronic stress and/or lifetime traumatic stress can create a self-reinforcing cycle of unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating and sedentary behavior, that can lead to further increases in stress. This study examined the relationship between stress and sedentary behavior in a sample of Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 4244) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

Methods:

Stress was measured as the number of ongoing difficulties lasting 6 months or more and as lifetime exposure to traumatic events. Sedentary behavior was measured by self-report and with accelerometer. Multivariable regression models examined associations of stress measures with time spent in sedentary behaviors adjusting by potential confounders.

Results:

Those who reported more than one chronic stressor spent, on average, 8 to 10 additional minutes per day in objectively measured sedentary activities (P < .05), whereas those with more than one lifetime traumatic stressor spent (after we adjusted for confounders) 10 to 14 additional minutes in sedentary activities (P < .01) compared with those who did not report any stressors. Statistical interactions between the 2 stress measures and age or sex were not significant.

Conclusion:

Interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behaviors might consider incorporating stress reduction into their approaches.