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  • Author: Sharon Ann Plowman x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
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Sharon Ann Plowman

The last decade has seen a shift in emphasis from the goal of attaining physical fitness (a product) to the behavior of physical activity (a process) to achieve health benefits. A central question is whether the achievement of physical fitness (PF) is necessary or if participation in physical activity (PA) is sufficient. Three basic tenets of this shift are examined by using representative studies. They are: (1) both PA and PF will lead to health benefits; PF is simply a surrogate measure for PA, (2) the impact of genetics will be avoided if PA, not PF, is emphasized and that is desirable, and (3) it is easier to motivate “the masses” to accumulate lifestyle moderate activity than to undergo a vigorous exercise prescription. Results indicate that PA and PF might be independent risk factors, that both have a degree of genetic determination, and that participation rates for PA have changed little and remain insufficient. Both PA and PF need to be evaluated, promoted, and attained.

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Tracy Danner and Sharon Ann Plowman

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a preceding intense cycling bout on subsequent running economy in female duathletes and triathletes. Thirteen female duathletes and triathletes (age = 27.5 ± 3.36 yrs.) took part in three testing sessions: (a) measurement of running economy at 169, 177, 196, and 215 m·min−1 and running VO2 max; (b) remeasurement of running economy and measurement of cycling VO2 max; and (c) a 45 minute cycling bout at 70% of cycling VO2 max, immediately followed by measurement of running economy. Intraclass correlation coefficients between Day 1 and Day 2 running economy values ranged from 0.31 to 0.78. A systematic difference occurred at 169 m·min−1 only, with mean VO2 being higher on Day 1 than Day 2 (p<0.02). Based upon dependent t-tests, significantly higher running economy values (p<0.02) but not blood lactate concentrations (p>0.02) following the submaximal cycling bout compared to the control condition (mean of Day 1 and Day 2), at each of the four test velocities were found. Therefore we conclude that running economy was significantly impaired following a 45 minute intense cycling bout in female duathletes and triathletes, but lactate values remained constant.

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Norman S. Hannibal III, Sharon Ann Plowman, Marilyn A. Looney and Jason Brandenburg

Background:

Strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility are important components of healthy back function. This study determined the reliability and evaluated the validity of selected low back field tests (FITNESSGRAM ® Trunk Extension [FG-TE] and Box 90° Dynamic Trunk Extension [B-90° DTE]) when compared to laboratory tests (Parallel Roman Chair Dynamic Trunk Extension [PRC-DTE], Parallel Roman Chair Static Trunk Extension [PRC-STE], and Dynamometer Static Back Lift [DSBL]).

Methods:

Forty males age 15.1 ± 1.2 yr and 32 females age 15.5 ± 1.2 yr participated.

Results:

Intraclass test-retest reliability coefficients (one-way ANOVA model for a single measure) ranged from .940 to .996. Validity coefficients determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficients for males and females, respectively, were as follows: B-90° DTE vs. PRC-DTE = .82, .62 (p < .05); B-90° DTE vs. PRC-STE = .55, .38 (p < .05); B-90° DTE vs. DSBL = −.29, −.23; FG-TE vs. PRC-DTE = .23, −.11; FG-TE vs. PRC-STE = −.15, .33; and FG-TE vs. DSBL = −.04, −.36.

Conclusions:

B-90° DTE was shown to be a valid field test when compared to PRC-DTE, but only for the males. Further research on the PRC-DTE and PRC-STE items for adolescents is recommended.