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  • Author: Ursula F. Julio x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
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Seihati A. Shiroma, Ursula F. Julio and Emerson Franchini

Purpose: To evaluate criterion validity, reliability, and usefulness of a test to measure maximal aerobic power using judo-specific movements (uchi-komi test [UKtest]). Methods: A total of 12 judokas performed 5 graded exercise tests (GETs) in 4 sessions. In sessions 1 and 2, upper-body (UBtest), lower-body (LBtest), and familiarization UKtest were performed. GETs were randomly performed and separated by at least 48 h. In sessions 3 and 4, test and retest UKtest were performed (7 d apart). For all GETs, peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak), maximal heart rate (HRmax), peak blood lactate concentration [Lapeak], maximal aerobic intensity, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were determined. Another group of 12 judokas performed the UKtest and 1 confirmation test (20 min after the UKtest) at 105% of maximal aerobic speed until exhaustion to confirm whether maximal responses were achieved. Results: V˙O2peak did not differ (P > .05) between UKtest (46.04 [5.34] mL·kg−1·min−1) and LBtest (44.78 [5.98] mL·kg−1·min−1), but it was higher (P < .05) than UBtest (37.03 [7.16] mL·kg−1·min−1). Total duration (551 [60] s) and [Lapeak] (7.10 [1.76] mmol·L−1) in the UKtest were different (P < .05) from UBtest (416 [47] s, 9.93 [2.15] mmol·L−1, respectively) and LBtest (433 [54] s, 10.29 [2.23] mmol·L−1, respectively). Very large relationships between V˙O2peak in UKtest with UBtest (r = .78; P = .003) and LBtest (r = .87; P < .001) were found. Maximal values were achieved for the UKtest V˙O2peak, HRmax, [Lapeak], RPE, and maximal aerobic speed, with no difference between test and retest (P > .05). In addition, very large intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for V˙O2peak (ICC = .86), HRmax (ICC = .90), and maximal aerobic speed (ICC = .81) were found. Conclusion: The UKtest can be considered a valid, reliable, and useful test to measure maximal aerobic power using judo-specific movements.

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Ursula F. Julio, Valéria L.G. Panissa, João V. Esteves, Rubiana L. Cury, Marcus F. Agostinho and Emerson Franchini

Purpose:

To estimate the contribution of the 3 energy systems to simulated judo matches.

Methods:

Twelve judo athletes (18 ± 1 y, 175.1 ± 5.3 cm, 74.3 ± 10.5 kg, 11.7% ± 1.5% body fat, 8 ± 2 y of practice) performed 5 combats with different durations (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min), against the same opponent, on different days and blinded to the duration. The estimated energy contributions for the oxidative, glycolytic, and ATP-PCr systems were calculated based on oxygen uptake (V̇O2) during activity, Delta of lactate, and the fast phase of excess V ̇ O2, respectively. Analysis of mixed models for repeated measures was used to compare the contribution of the 3 energy systems and different durations of judo matches, followed by a post hoc Bonferroni test.

Results:

The oxidative system’s contribution (70%) was higher than those of the glycolytic (8%; P < .001) and ATP-PCr (21%; P < .001) energy systems (in all durations), and the ATP-PCr contribution was higher than that of the glycolytic energy system (up to 3 min). In addition, during the match there was an increase in the oxidative (from 50% to 81%; P < .001), a decrease in the ATP-PCr (from 40% to 12%; P < .001), and maintenance of the glycolytic contributions (between 6% and 10%).

Conclusions:

There is a predominance of the oxidative system to supply the energy cost of judo matches from the first minute of combat up to the end, compared with the anaerobic systems.

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Emerson Franchini, Monica Y. Takito, Rodrigo M. da Silva, Seihati A. Shiroma, Lance Wicks and Ursula F. Julio

Purpose:

To determine the optimal interval between competitions for success in the different events of the judo world tour.

Methods:

A total of 20,916 female and 29,900 male competition participations in the judo world-tour competitions held between January 2009 and December 2015 were analyzed, considering the dependent variable, winning a medal, and the independent variables, levels of competition.

Results:

There was an increased probability of winning a medal when the interval was in the 10- to 13-wk range for both male and female athletes competing at Grand Prix, Continental-Championship, and World-Championship events, whereas for Grand Slam, only men had an increased probability of winning a medal in this interval range. Furthermore, men had increased probability of podium positions in Continental Championship, World Master, and Olympic Games when the interval was longer than 14 wk.

Conclusion:

Optimal interval period between successive competitions varies according to competition level and sex; shorter intervals (6–9 wk) were better for female athletes competing at the lowest competition level (Continental Open), but for most of the competitions, the 10- to 13-wk interval was detected as optimal for both male and female athletes (Grand Prix, Continental Championship, and World Championship), whereas for the ranking-based qualified male competitions (ie, Masters and Olympic Games), a longer period (>14 wk) is needed.