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  • Author: Adam B. Rosen x
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Hyunjae Jeon, Melanie L. McGrath, Neal Grandgenett and Adam B. Rosen

Context: Patellar tendinopathy (PT) is prevalent in physically active populations, and it affects their quality of living, performance of activity, and may contribute to the early cessation of their athletic careers. A number of previous studies have identified contributing factors for PT; however, their contributions to self-reported dysfunction remain unclear. Objective: The purpose of this investigation was to determine if strength, flexibility, and various lower-extremity static alignments contributed to self-reported function and influence the severity of PT. Design: Cross-sectional research design. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: A total of 30 participants with PT volunteered for this study (age: 23.4 [3.6] y, height: 1.8 [0.1] m, mass: 80.0 [20.3] kg, body mass index: 25.7 [4.3]). Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed 7 different patient-reported outcomes. Isometric knee extension and flexion strength, hamstring flexibility and alignment measures of rearfoot angle, navicular drop, tibial torsion, q-angle, genu recurvatum, pelvic tilt, and leg length differences were assessed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were assessed to determine significantly correlated outcome variables with each of the patient-reported outcomes. The factors with the highest correlations were used to identify factors that contribute the most to pain and dysfunction using backward selection, linear regression models. Results: Correlation analysis found significant relationships between questionnaires and body mass index (r = −.35–.46), normalized knee extension (r = .38–.50) and flexion strength (r = −.34–.50), flexibility (r = .32–.38, q-angle (r = .38–.56), and pelvic tilt (r = −.40). Regression models (R 2 = .22–.54) identified thigh musculature strength and supine q-angle to have greatest predictability for severity in patient-reported outcomes. Conclusions: These findings put an emphasis of bodyweight management, improving knee extensor and flexor strength, and posterior flexibility in PT patients.

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Christopher J. Burcal, Sunghoon Chung, Madison L. Johnston and Adam B. Rosen

Background: Region-specific patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are commonly used in rehabilitation medicine. Digital versions of PROs may be implemented into electronic medical records and are also commonly used in research, but the validity of this method of administration (MOA) must be established. Purpose: To determine the agreement between and compare the test–retest reliability of a paper version (FAAM-P) and digital version (FAAM-D) of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). Study Design: Randomized, nonblinded, crossover observational study. Methods: A total of 90 adults were randomized to complete the FAAM-P or FAAM-D first, and then completed the second MOA (first day [D1]). The FAAM-D was a digital adaptation of both FAAM-P subscales on Qualtrics. Identical test procedures were completed 1 week later (D2). Data were removed if a participant scored 100% on both MOA, reported injury between D1 and D2, or did not complete both MOA. Agreement was assessed on 46 participants between the 2 MOA using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) at D1. There was good-to-excellent test–retest reliability for the FAAM activities of daily living. Results: The authors observed good agreement between the FAAM-P and FAAM-D for the activities of daily living (ICC = .88) and sport scales (ICC = .87). Test–retest reliability was good-to-excellent for the FAAM activities of daily living (FAAM-P: ICC = .87; FAAM-D: ICC = .89) and sport (FAAM-P: ICC = .71; FAAM-D: ICC = .91). Conclusions: The MOA does not appear to affect the responses on the FAAM; however, the authors observed slightly higher reliability on the FAAM-D. The FAAM-D is sufficient to be used for generating practice-based evidence in rehabilitation medicine.

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Takeaki Ando, Shannon Gehr, Melanie L. McGrath and Adam B. Rosen

The purpose of this report is to present the case of a National Junior Collegiate Athletic Association football player diagnosed with Chiari malformation postconcussion. A Chiari malformation is characterized by the cerebellum presenting below the level of the foramen. The uniqueness of this case stems from the patient’s health history, length of symptoms, and diagnosis. The effectiveness of treatment options, and the primary means to reduce the risk of catastrophic head injury in those with Chiari malformations are debatable. Clinicians should be familiar with the potential for the presence of a Chiari malformation with persistent symptoms postconcussion.

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Christine C. Center, Samuel J. Wilkins, Ross Mathiasen and Adam B. Rosen

The purpose of this report is to present the case of a high school football player who sustained an injury during a game, resulting in an acute subdural hematoma (SDH). The patient underwent an emergent decompressive craniectomy. The uniqueness of the case is due to both rare pathology and treatment. The athlete had a positive outcome due to prompt on-field assessment and advanced surgical treatments. Athletic trainers should know how to recognize symptoms of emergent traumatic brain injuries and be prepared to implement an emergency action plan when necessary.

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Adam B. Rosen, Jupil Ko, Kathy J. Simpson and Cathleen N. Brown

Patellar tendinopathy is often managed with a patellar tendon strap, however, their effectiveness is unsubstantiated. The purpose of this study was to determine if straps altered pain or lower extremity kinetics of individuals with patellar tendinopathy during landing. Thirty participants with patellar tendinopathy and 30 controls completed drop jumps with and without patellar tendon straps. Wearing the strap, tendinopathy participants demonstrated significantly decreased pain and reduced knee adductor moment; all participants displayed significantly decreased anterior ground reaction force while wearing a strap. Patellar tendon strapping may reduce pain due to alterations in direction and magnitude of loading.

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Joanne E. Folker, Bruce E. Murdoch, Louise M. Cahill, Kristin M. Rosen, Martin B. Delatycki, Louise A. Corben and Adam P. Vogel

Electromagnetic articulography (EMA) was used to investigate the tongue kinematics in the dysarthria associated with Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA). The subject group consisted of four individuals diagnosed with FRDA. Five nonneurologically impaired individuals, matched for age and gender, served as controls. Each participant was assessed using the AG-200 EMA system during six repetitions of the tongue tip sentence Tess told Dan to stay fit and the tongue back sentence Karl got a croaking frog. Results revealed reduced speed measures (i.e., maximum acceleration / deceleration / velocity), greater movement durations and increased articulatory distances for the approach phases of consonant productions. The approach phase, involving movement up to the palate, was more affected than the release phase. It is suggested that deviant lingual kinematics could be the outcome of disturbances to cerebellar function, or possibly in combination with disturbances to upper motor neuron systems.

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Joanne E. Folker, Bruce E. Murdoch, Louise M. Cahill, Kristin M. Rosen, Martin B. Delatycki, Louise A. Corben and Adam P. Vogel

Electropalatography (EPG) was used to describe the pattern of linguopalatal contact and the consonant phase durations exhibited by a group of seven individuals with dysarthria associated with Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA). A group of 14 non-neurologically impaired individuals served as controls. The Reading Electropalatograph (EPG3) system was used to record linguopalatal contact during production of the target consonants (/t/, /l/, /s/, /k/) elicited in five words of CV and CVC construction, with the target consonants in word initial position. These words were embedded into short sentences and repeated five times by each participant. The FRDA group exhibited significantly increased consonant durations compared with the controls while maintaining normal linguopalatal contact patterns. These findings suggest that the articulatory impairment in FRDA manifests as a temporal rather than spatial disturbance.