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Meg G. Hancock, Alicia Cintron and Lindsey Darvin

In recent years, the field of sport management has witnessed a flurry of research on the career experiences of women in sport organizations. The perceived gendered nature of work and subsequent segregation of positions in a sport organization implies men and women pursue or align career paths based on gender. There are few studies, however, that explore how men and women select a career in sport management. This paper employed Vocational Anticipatory Socialization theory as a framework for exploring vocational interests, entry into intercollegiate athletic administration, and the role of gender in career selection. Thirty-four men and women serving in NCAA Division I intercollegiate athletic administration roles were interviewed. Findings suggested that social relationships, early career experiences, and career interests and values were critical factors in the socialization process. The position in which a person entered the field of intercollegiate athletics often dictated the career path. There is limited evidence that gender influenced career paths. Implications for practice and future research are also discussed.

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Alicia Cintron, Jeffrey F. Levine and Marion E. Hambrick

At the upcoming National Hockey League (NHL) owners’ meeting in Boca Raton, Florida, team owners are meeting to discuss franchise expansion. League executives believe adding two new franchises would increase viewership and popularity, generate higher revenues, and balance the Eastern and Western Conferences. However, it is unclear whether viable markets for two new franchises exist. Despite this concern, five ownership groups representing five distinct North American cities—Seattle, Washington; Las Vegas, Nevada; Kansas City, Missouri; Indianapolis, Indiana; and Québec City, Québec, Canada—have emerged as viable candidates for an expansion franchise. Given the five ownership groups, the NHL now needs to decide which cities to choose as the new homes for its two expansion teams, based on each city’s viability to host a professional team. Each ownership group will present a case on why its city should be the future home of a new NHL expansion team.