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  • Author: Amanda N. Szabo x
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Thomas R. Wójcicki, Amanda N. Szabo, Siobhan M. White, Emily L. Mailey, Arthur F. Kramer and Edward McAuley

Background:

The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which participation in a 12-month exercise program changed the degree of importance that older adults attached to physical activity. In addition, associations among changes in physical activity importance and health-related and psychosocial outcomes were examined.

Methods:

Community-dwelling older adults (N = 179) were recruited to participate in a 12-month exercise trial examining the association between changes in physical activity and fitness with changes in brain structure and psychological health. Participants were randomly assigned to a walking condition or a flexibility, toning, and balance condition. Physical, psychological, and cognitive assessments were taken at months 0, 6, and 12.

Results:

Involvement in a 12-month exercise program increased the importance that participants placed on physical activity; this positive change was similar across exercise condition and sex. Changes in importance, however, were only associated with changes in physical health status and outcome expectations for exercise midway through the intervention. There were no significant associations at the end of the program.

Conclusions:

Regular participation in physical activity can positively influence the perceived importance of the behavior itself. Yet, the implications of such changes on physical activity-related outcomes remain equivocal and warrant further investigation.

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Emily L. Mailey, Neha P. Gothe, Thomas R. Wójcicki, Amanda N. Szabo, Erin A. Olson, Sean P. Mullen, Jason T. Fanning, Robert W. Motl and Edward McAuley

The criteria one uses to reduce accelerometer data can profoundly influence the interpretation of research outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of 3 different interruption periods (i.e., 20, 30, and 60 min) on the amount of data retained for analyses and estimates of sedentary time among older adults. Older adults (N = 311, M age = 71.1) wore an accelerometer for 7 d and reported wear time on an accelerometer log. Accelerometer data were downloaded and scored using 20-, 30-, and 60-min interruption periods. Estimates of wear time, derived using each interruption period, were compared with self-reported wear time, and descriptive statistics were used to compare estimates of sedentary time. Results showed a longer interruption period (i.e., 60 min) yields the largest sample size and the closest approximation of self-reported wear time. A short interruption period (i.e., 20 min) is likely to underestimate sedentary time among older adults.

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Erik A. Willis, Amanda N. Szabo-Reed, Lauren T. Ptomey, Jeffery J. Honas, Felicia L. Steger, Richard A. Washburn and Joseph E. Donnelly

Background: High-intensity functional training (HIFT) may offer an attractive, time-efficient alternative to traditional aerobic exercise. However, limited information is available in the literature regarding HIFT meeting exercise guidelines for energy expenditure (improve health outcomes: ≥1000 kcal/wk; weight management: ≥2000 kcal/wk) and level of intensity (moderate: 3–6 metabolic equivalents [METs], vigorous: ≥6 METs) elicited by this approach. Thus, the primary aim was to objectively measure energy expenditure and intensity of HIFT sessions. Methods: Energy expenditure was assessed in 20 adults (18–50 y, 50% females). The HIFT session format included the following segments: warm-up (∼5 min), exercise (∼35 min), and cooldown (∼5 min). Participant oxygen consumption (COSMED, L/min and mL/kg/min), heart rate (Polar RS400), and physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X+) were collected in 15-second intervals. Average kcal per minute, METs, total kcal per session, and percent maximum heart rate (HRmax) were calculated. Results: METs ranged from 5.5 to 11.6 for the complete session (including warm-up and cooldown). Participant’s HRmax was ∼80% (range: 69%–100%). Average energy expenditure was ∼485 kcal per session (∼1400 kcal/wk). The vigorous-intensity exercise portion (∼35 min) contributed to 80% of total energy expenditure. Conclusions: HIFT has the potential to meet the recommendations for exercise to improve health outcomes.