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  • Author: André Lacroix x
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Urs Granacher, Andre Lacroix, Katrin Roettger, Albert Gollhofer and Thomas Muehlbauer

This study investigated associations between variables of trunk muscle strength (TMS), spinal mobility, and balance in seniors. Thirty-four seniors (sex: 18 female, 16 male; age: 70 ± 4 years; activity level: 13 ± 7 hr/week) were tested for maximal isometric strength (MIS) of the trunk extensors, flexors, lateral flexors, rotators, spinal mobility, and steady-state, reactive, and proactive balance. Significant correlations were detected between all measures of TMS and static steady-state balance (r = .43−.57, p < .05). Significant correlations were observed between specific measures of TMS and dynamic steady-state balance (r = .42−.55, p < .05). No significant correlations were found between all variables of TMS and reactive/proactive balance and between all variables of spinal mobility and balance. Regression analyses revealed that TMS explains between 1–33% of total variance of the respective balance parameters. Findings indicate that TMS is related to measures of steady-state balance which may imply that TMS promoting exercises should be integrated in strength training for seniors.

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Rebekka Pomiersky, Bastian Abel, Christian Werner, André Lacroix, Klaus Pfeiffer, Martina Schäufele and Klaus Hauer

This study investigated the effectivity and sustainability of a physical activity (PA) promotion and motor training programs and analyzed predictors for PA changes in persons with dementia. A total of 122 participants with mild-to-moderate dementia were randomized to the intervention program designed for persons with dementia (intervention group) or a motor placebo activity (control group). The primary outcome was the Physical Activity Questionnaire for the Elderly assessed at the baseline, after the 3-month intervention, and at a 3-month follow-up. The PA promotion program significantly increased PA in the intervention group compared with the control group during the training intervention phase. Both groups showed an increase in habitual PA when intervention-induced activities were excluded. PA was sustainably increased in both groups at follow-up. Low baseline PA was predictive for increased PA after the intervention and low baseline PA, high motor performance, and low comorbidity for increased PA at follow-up.