Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: Andrew Russell x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Andrew J.A. Hall, Leigh Jones and Russell J.J. Martindale

Currently, little work has evaluated the impact of interventions within talent development environments (TDEs). This study is the first of its kind to evaluate the efficacy of the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire (TDEQ) as a tool to help coaches and support staff gain feedback, structure interventions, and evaluate impact over a 12-month period of an international elite TDE. Sixteen full time professional male rugby union players, the Chief Rugby Operations Officer, General Manager of Rugby Performance, and the Head of the Elite Rugby Program participated in the research. The TDEQ baseline results identified 17 weaknesses and nine strengths. Subsequently, an evidence based intervention designed by a staff and player working group was implemented. After the 12-month intervention, there were five weaknesses and 18 strengths with seven targeted and five non-targeted TDEQ items showing statistically significant improvements. Implications for practioners and policy makers on the use of the TDEQ as a mechanism for evidence based impact on evaluation, intervention design, and monitoring in elite TDEs are discussed.

Restricted access

Warren Young, Andrew Russell, Peter Burge, Alex Clarke, Stuart Cormack and Glenn Stewart

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between split times within sprint tests over 30 m and 40 m in elite Australian Rules footballers.

Methods:

Data were analyzed from two Australian Football League (AFL) clubs. The first club (n = 35) conducted a 40-m sprint test and recorded split times at 10 m and 20 m. The second club (n = 30) conducted a 30-m sprint test and recorded splits at 10 m and 20 m. Analyses included calculation of Pearson correlations and common variances between all the split times as well as “flying” times (20–40 m for the first club and 20 to 30 m for the second club).

Results:

There was a high correlation (r = 0.94) between 10-m time and 20-m time within each club, indicating these measures assessed very similar speed qualities. The correlations between 10-m time and times to 30 m and 40 m decreased, but still produced common variances of 79% and 66% respectively. However when the “flying” times (20–40 m and 20–30 m) were correlated to 10-m time, the common variances decreased substantially to 25% and 42% respectively, indicating uniqueness.

Conclusions:

It was concluded that 10-m time is a good refection of acceleration capabilities and either 20 to 40 m in a 40-m sprint test or 20 to 30 m in a 30-m sprint test can be used to estimate maximum speed capabilities. It was suggested that sprint tests over 30 m or 40 m can be conducted indoors to provide useful information about independent speed qualities in athletes.

Restricted access

Jihong Liu, Jinseok Kim, Natalie Colabianchi, Andrew Ortaglia and Russell R. Pate

Background:

We examined the covarying patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviors among adolescents and their long-term maintenance.

Methods:

Data came from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1995–2002). We used latent class analysis to identify distinct covarying patterns in adolescence. Logistic regression models were used to predict odds of meeting moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) recommendations (≥5 bouts/week) and exceeding screen time guidelines (>2 hours/day) 6 years later based on their adolescent class profile.

Results:

Five classes for each gender were identified and labeled as low physical activity (PA)/low sedentary behaviors (SED), moderate (Mod) PA/high (HI) SED, Mod PA/low SED, HI PA/low SED, and HI PA (except skating/biking)/low SED. Compared with low PA/low SED, males and females in Mod PA/low SED, HI PA/low SED, and HI PA (except skating/biking)/low SED classes had increased odds of meeting MVPA recommendations in young adulthood. Mod PA/HI SED had higher odds of exceeding screen time guidelines in young adulthood (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] for females: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.00−2.81; AOR for males: 3.31, 95% CI: 1.80−6.09).

Conclusions:

Findings are useful to aid the development of multifactorial interventions that promote physical activity and reduce screen time among adolescents transitioning to adulthood.

Restricted access

Diane M. Wiese-Bjornstal, Andrew C. White, Hayley C. Russell and Aynsley M. Smith

The psychology of sport concussions consists of psychological, psychiatric, and psychosocial factors that contribute to sport concussion risks, consequences, and outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to present a sport concussion-adapted version of the integrated model of psychological response to sport injury and rehabilitation (Wiese-Bjornstal, Smith, Shaffer, & Morrey, 1998) as a framework for understanding the roles of psychological, psychiatric, and psychosocial factors in sport concussions. Elements of this model include preinjury psychological risk factors, postinjury psychological response and rehabilitation processes, and postinjury psychological care components. Mapped onto each element of this model are findings from the research literature through a narrative review process. An important caveat is that the subjective nature of concussion diagnoses presents limitations in these findings. Future research should examine psychological contributors to concussion risk, influences of physical factors on psychological symptoms and responses, and efficacy of psychological treatments utilizing theory-driven approaches.

Restricted access

Russell L. Carson, Michael A. Hemphill, K. Andrew R. Richards and Tom Templin

As teachers move toward the end of their careers, understanding the experiences that help them derive satisfaction from their work has implications for helping them stay engaged in teaching. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively examine the job satisfaction of late career physical education teachers. Jessica, Sandy, and Bill were later career physical education teachers (17–28 years of experience) who served as participants. All three had been colleagues at Harrisburg Middle School for 13 years. Data were collected using a job satisfaction graphing technique and qualitative interviews, and were analyzed using inductive analysis and constant comparison. Data analysis resulted in three themes related to the interactions teachers experienced with people in the school: ‘the kids and control,’ ‘our administration and marginalization,’ and ‘my fellow coworkers.’ Each theme related to both positive and negative appraisals of the teachers’ work. Implications for practice and future research are noted.