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  • Author: Ann Lavrysen x
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Ann Lavrysen, Werner F. Helsen, Digby Elliott and Jos J. Adam

The one-target advantage refers to a shorter movement time for one-target aiming movements, in comparison to aiming attempts followed by a second movement. Theoretical explanations of the one-target advantage vary in the extent to which they attribute this phenomenon to prior planning or to online control mechanisms. In this research, we attempted to gain insight into the control of sequential aiming movements by manipulating the availability of online feedback during this first or second movement component. When the participants' vision was occluded during the first movement (Experiment 1) or during the second movement (Experiment 2), their performance was affected, showing that vision was important for online control of the movement sequence. A one-target advantage was found when the second movement was in the same direction as me first, but not when it was reversed with respect to the home button. Both prior planning and online control processes contribute to the one-target advantage. The degree to which these processes are important for limb control depends on the specific task demands.

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Florian Van Halewyck, Ann Lavrysen, Oron Levin, Digby Elliott and Werner F. Helsen

Older adults traditionally adapt their discrete aiming movements, thereby traveling a larger proportion of the movement under closed-loop control. As the beneficial impact of a physically active lifestyle in older age has been described for several aspects of motor control, we compared the aiming performance of young controls to active and sedentary older adults. To additionally determine the contribution of visual feedback, aiming movements were executed with and without saccades. Results showed only sedentary older adults adopted the typical movement changes, highlighting the impact of a physically active lifestyle on manual aiming in older age. In an attempt to reveal the mechanism underlying the movement changes, evidence for an age-related decline in force control was found, which in turn resulted in an adapted aiming strategy. Finally, prohibiting saccades did not affect older adults’ performance to a greater extent, suggesting they do not rely more on visual feedback than young controls.