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  • Author: Antonio García-Hermoso x
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Antonio García-Hermoso, Mairena Sánchez-López and Vicente Martínez-Vizcaíno

The purpose of this meta-analysis of randomized trials was to determine the effectiveness of aerobic plus resistance exercise interventions on body composition related to variables in overweight and obese youth. A computerized search was made of 7 databases. The analysis was restricted to randomized controlled trials that examined the effect of aerobic and resistance exercise on body composition (body weight, body mass index, fat mass, fat-free mass, and waist circumference) in obese youth. Two independent reviewers screened studies and extracted data. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Nine studies were selected for meta-analysis as they fulfilled the inclusion criteria (n = 365). Aerobic plus resistance exercise interventions (8–24 weeks duration) produced a decrease in body weight (WMD=-3.31 kg), body mass index (WMD=-1.05 kg/m2), and fat mass (WMD=-1.93% and 5.05 kg), but changes in fatfree mass and waist circumference were not observed. These changes were accentuated through programs of at least 60 min of exercise per session, generating greater reductions in body weight (WMD=-4.11 kg), fat mass (WMD=-4.07%), and increase in fat-free mass (WMD = 2.45 kg). This meta-analysis provides insight into the effectiveness of short-term aerobic plus resistance exercise interventions for decreasing body weight, body mass index, and fat mass in pediatric obesity.

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Francisco Alvarez-Barbosa, Jesús del Pozo-Cruz, Borja del Pozo-Cruz, Antonio García-Hermoso and Rosa María Alfonso-Rosa

The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of whole-body vibration on balance, functional mobility, gait, functional performance, and quality of life in institutionalized older people. Eight databases were systematically reviewed, as recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration. This systematic review was designed to answer the acronym set by the participants, interventions, comparators, and outcomes (PICO)-model. Ten randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. The analysis of the mean differences (MDs) of the functional mobility assessed with Time Up and Go test was MD = −2.49 s (95% confidence interval, CI, [−4.37, −0.61]; I 2 = 68%). In 279 participants from five studies, the overall MD = 0.49 (95% CI [−0.13, 1.11]; I 2 = 23%) for gait, and MD = 0.96 (95% CI [−0.45, 2.37]; I 2 = 85%) for balance, which represents the total Tinetti score, MD = 1.59 (95% CI [−0.52, 3.70]; I 2 = 82%). In summary, whole-body vibration could have benefits on functional mobility in institutionalized older people.

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Jorge Cañete García-Prieto, Vicente Martinez-Vizcaino, Antonio García-Hermoso, Mairena Sánchez-López, Natalia Arias-Palencia, Juan Fernando Ortega Fonseca and Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

The aim of this study was to examine the energy expenditure (EE) measured using indirect calorimetry (IC) during playground games and to assess the validity of heart rate (HR) and accelerometry counts as indirect indicators of EE in children´s physical activity games. 32 primary school children (9.9 ± 0.6 years old, 19.8 ± 4.9 kg · m-2 BMI and 37.6 ± 7.2 ml · kg-1 · min-1 VO2max). Indirect calorimetry (IC), accelerometry and HR data were simultaneously collected for each child during a 90 min session of 30 playground games. Thirty-eight sessions were recorded in 32 different children. Each game was recorded at least in three occasions in other three children. The intersubject coefficient of variation within a game was 27% for IC, 37% for accelerometry and 13% for HR. The overall mean EE in the games was 4.2 ± 1.4 kcals · min-1 per game, totaling to 375 ± 122 kcals/per 90 min/session. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and accelerometer counts was 0.48 (p = .026) for endurance games and 0.21 (p = .574) for strength games. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and HR was 0.71 (p = .032) for endurance games and 0.48 (p = .026) for strength games. Our data indicate that both accelerometer and HR monitors are useful devices for estimating EE during endurance games, but only HR monitors estimates are accurate for endurance games.

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Nicolas Aguilar-Farias, Sebastian Miranda-Marquez, Kabir P. Sadarangani, Pia Martino-Fuentealba, Carlos Cristi-Montero, Jaime Carcamo-Oyarzun, Pedro Delgado-Floody, Damian Chandia-Poblete, Camila Mella-Garcia, Fernando Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Astrid Von Oetinger, Teresa Balboa-Castillo, Sebastian Peña, Cristobal Cuadrado, Paula Bedregal, Carlos Celis-Morales, Antonio García-Hermoso and Andrea Cortinez-O’Ryan