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Guy El Hajj Boutros, José A. Morais and Antony D. Karelis

Physical activity plays an important role for achieving healthy aging by promoting independence and increasing the quality of life. However, current guidelines for physical activity in older adults may be difficult to achieve in an older population. Indeed, there is evidence to suggest that increasing exercise intensity in older adults may be associated with greater reductions in the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Therefore, the idea prescribing high-intensity exercise protocols such as high-intensity interval training and high-intensity resistance training becomes an intriguing strategy for healthy aging. Collectively, the literature review in this viewpoint will briefly focus on summarizing alternative/novel time-efficient approaches in physical activity toward healthy aging. Our goal is to hopefully open a discussion on possibly revising the current physical activity guidelines in older adults.

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Annie Fex, Jean-Philippe Leduc-Gaudet, Marie-Eve Filion, Antony D. Karelis and Mylène Aubertin-Leheudre

Objectives:

The purpose of the current study was to examine the impact of 12 weeks of elliptical high intensity interval training (HIIT) on metabolic risk factors and body composition in pre- and type 2 diabetes patients.

Methods:

Sixteen pre- (n = 8) and type 2 diabetes (n = 8) participants completed this study. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, anthropometric measurements, body composition (DXA), blood pressure, resting heart rate, VO2max, and dietary factors, as well as total and physical activity energy expenditure, were measured. The HIIT program on the elliptical was performed 3 times a week for 12 weeks.

Results:

After the intervention, we observed a significant improvement for fasting blood glucose, waist and hip circumference, appendicular fat mass, leg lean body mass and appendicular lean body mass, systolic blood pressure, resting heart rate, and VO2max (P < .05). In addition, we noted a lower tendency for leg fat mass (P = .06) and diastolic blood pressure (P = .05) as well as a higher tendency for total energy expenditure (P = .06) after the intervention.

Conclusions:

The current study indicates that elliptical HIIT seems to improve metabolic risk factors and body composition in pre- and type 2 diabetes patients.