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Beth Hands and Helen Parker

Background:

Different approaches to measuring physical activity and fatness in youth have resulted in studies reporting relationships ranging from very strong to nonexistent.

Methods:

The sample comprised 787 boys and 752 girls between the ages of 7 and 16 years. Pedometer-determined physical activity, height, weight, and waist girth measures were taken.

Results:

Significant differences were found in activity level between body mass index-determined weight categories for the girls (F 1,742 = 9.07, P = .003) but not for the boys (F 1,777 = 3.59, P = .06) and between truncal adiposity groupings for the boys (F 1,777 = 4.69, P = .03) and the girls (F 1,742= 13.56, P = .000).

Conclusions:

The relationship between physical activity and body fatness differs according to the measure used and between boys and girls. Factors contributing to body fatness such as eating behaviors or sedentary activities might be more important among boys than girls.

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Amanda Timler, Fleur McIntyre and Beth Hands

An adolescent’s motor skill competence can affect areas such as sports participation, social activities, and future academic or employment decisions. The Adolescent Motor Competence Questionnaire (AMCQ) is a 26-item questionnaire that uses a four-point Likert scale response (never, sometimes, frequently, always) to assess motor-related activities during adolescence. This study aims to provide evidence of the construct validity of the AMCQ using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and to identify factors that contributed to Australian adolescent self-reported motor competence. A final aim was to determine whether individual item responses differed between males and females. The AMCQ was completed by 160 adolescents (12 to 16 years old, M age = 14.45 years, SD = .75). The PCA using varimax rotation extracted four factors (Eiqenvalue of ≥1.21) explaining 52% of variance and representing Participation in Physical Activity and Sports, Activities of Daily Living, Public Performance, and Peer Comparison. Overall, males reported higher AMCQ scores compared to females. Females responded negatively (sometimes/never) to all items, particularly those on Physical Activity and Sports and Public Performance. Males who responded negatively had lower AMCQ scores than the females. These findings indicate male and female adolescents may judge their motor competence on different factors, which should be considered when planning physical activity interventions.

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Claire E. Francis, Patricia E. Longmuir, Charles Boyer, Lars Bo Andersen, Joel D. Barnes, Elena Boiarskaia, John Cairney, Avery D. Faigenbaum, Guy Faulkner, Beth P. Hands, John A. Hay, Ian Janssen, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Han C. G. Kemper, Duane Knudson, Meghann Lloyd, Thomas L. McKenzie, Tim S. Olds, Jennifer M. Sacheck, Roy J. Shephard, Weimo Zhu and Mark S. Tremblay

Background:

The Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy (CAPL) was conceptualized as a tool to monitor children’s physical literacy. The original model (fitness, activity behavior, knowledge, motor skill) required revision and relative weights for calculating/interpreting scores were required.

Methods:

Nineteen childhood physical activity/fitness experts completed a 3-round Delphi process. Round 1 was open-ended questions. Subsequent rounds rated statements using a 5-point Likert scale. Recommendations were sought regarding protocol inclusion, relative importance within composite scores and score interpretation.

Results:

Delphi participant consensus was achieved for 64% (47/73) of statement topics, including a revised conceptual model, specific assessment protocols, the importance of longitudinal tracking, and the relative importance of individual protocols and composite scores. Divergent opinions remained regarding the inclusion of sleep time, assessment/scoring of the obstacle course assessment of motor skill, and the need for an overall physical literacy classification.

Conclusions:

The revised CAPL model (overlapping domains of physical competence, motivation, and knowledge, encompassed by daily behavior) is appropriate for monitoring the physical literacy of children aged 8 to 12 years. Objectively measured domains (daily behavior, physical competence) have higher relative importance. The interpretation of CAPL results should be reevaluated as more data become available.