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  • Author: Brian Kliszczewiscz x
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John Quindry, Lindsey Miller, Graham McGinnis, Brian Kliszczewiscz, Dustin Slivka, Charles Dumke, John Cuddy and Brent Ruby

Previous research findings indicate that environmental temperature can influence exercise-induced oxidative-stress responses, although the response to variable temperatures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of warm, cold, and “neutral,” or room, environmental temperatures on the blood oxidative stress associated with exercise and recovery. Participants (N = 12, age 27 ± 5 yr, VO2max = 56.7 ± 5.8 ml · kg-1 · min-1, maximal cycle power output = 300 ± 39 W) completed 3 exercise sessions consisting of a 1-hr ride at 60% Wmax, at 40% relative humidity in warm (33 °C), cold (7 °C), and room-temperature environments (20 °C) in a randomized crossover fashion. Rectal core temperature was monitored continually as participants remained in the respective trial temperature throughout a 3-hr recovery. Blood was collected preexercise and immediately, 1 hr, and 3 hr postexercise and analyzed for oxidative-stress markers including ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), lipid hydroperoxides, and protein carbonyls. Core temperature was significantly elevated by all exercise trials, but recovery core temperatures reflected the given environment. FRAP (p < .001), TEAC (p < .001), and lipid hydroperoxides (p < .001) were elevated after warm exercise while protein carbonyls were not altered (p > .05). These findings indicate that moderate-intensity exercise and associated recovery in a warm environment elicits a blood oxidative-stress response not observed at comparable exercise performed at lower temperatures.

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Graham McGinnis, Brian Kliszczewiscz, Matthew Barberio, Christopher Ballmann, Bridget Peters, Dustin Slivka, Charles Dumke, John Cuddy, Walter Hailes, Brent Ruby and John Quindry

Hypoxic exercise is characterized by workloads decrements. Because exercise and high altitude independently elicit redox perturbations, the study purpose was to examine hypoxic and normoxic steady-state exercise on blood oxidative stress. Active males (n = 11) completed graded cycle ergometry in normoxic (975 m) and hypoxic (3,000 m) simulated environments before programing subsequent matched intensity or workload steady-state trials. In a randomized counterbalanced crossover design, participants completed three 60-min exercise bouts to investigate the effects of hypoxia and exercise intensity on blood oxidative stress. Exercise conditions were paired as such; 60% normoxic VO2peak performed in a normoxic environment (normoxic intensity-normoxic environment, NI-NE), 60% hypoxic VO2peak performed in a normoxic environment (HI-NE), and 60% hypoxic VO2peak performed in a hypoxic environment (HI-HE). Blood plasma samples drawn pre (Pre), 0 (Post), 2 (2HR) and 4 (4HR) hr post exercise were analyzed for oxidative stress biomarkers including ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and protein carbonyls (PCs). Repeated-measures ANOVA were performed, a priori significance of p ≤ .05. Oxygen saturation during the HI-HE trial was lower than NI-NE and HI-NE (p < .05). A Time × Trial interaction was present for LOOH (p = .013). In the HI-HE trial, LOOH were elevated for all time points post while PC (time; p = .001) decreased post exercise. As evidenced by the decrease in absolute workload during hypoxic VO2peak and LOOH increased during HI-HE versus normoxic exercise of equal absolute (HI-NE) and relative (NI-NE) intensities. Results suggest acute hypoxia elicits work decrements associated with post exercise oxidative stress.