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Sheila A. Dugan, Kelly Karavolos, Elizabeth B. Lynch, Chiquia S. Hollings, Francis Fullam, Brittney S. Lange-Maia, and Lynda H. Powell

Background:

Physical inactivity in midlife women is associated with increased intra-abdominal adipose tissue development. We describe an innovative multimethod study 1) to better understand barriers to physical activity (PA) and 2) to engage midlife women to product test physical activities and identify local community-based providers and sustainable and fun PA experiences.

Methods:

Formative research on PA barriers from the Chicago site Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN) ancillary study of midlife women was used to develop a pilot testing measure. Feasibility, acceptability and sustainability of the PA activities were determined using the measure.

Results:

Desirable locations and/or instructors were identified. The first 2 groups identified, pilot tested, and then ranked activities for their ability to promote sustained PA. The 6 top-ranked were: circuit training, total body fitness, kickboxing, Zumba, Pilates, and pedometer. The final group pilot tested highly ranked PA in 2-week blocks, and ranked pedometer and Zumba in their top 3.

Conclusion:

Consensus was reached regarding activities that could be valuable in promoting sustained PA in midlife women. Choosing convenient sites and popular instructors further facilitates sustainability. Building relationships with key community partners is essential for sustainability. Community-based participant involvement in study design is a critical element in developing a healthy living intervention.

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Andrea Stewart, Barbara Sternfeld, Brittney S. Lange-Maia, Kelly R. Ylitalo, Alicia Colvin, Carrie A. Karvonen-Gutierrez, Sheila A. Dugan, Robin R. Green, and Kelley Pettee Gabriel

Purpose: To examine racial/ethnic differences in participant-reported and device-based estimates of sedentary and physical activity behaviors and correlations between measurement methods in midlife and young-old women. Methods: Data are from 1,257 Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation participants, aged 60–72 who agreed to participate in an accelerometer protocol and had valid wear time (46% White, 26% Black, 12% Chinese, 10% Japanese, 6% Hispanic). Measures from the Kaiser Physical Activity Scale (KPAS) and ActiGraph wGT3X-BT were summarized overall and by race/ethnic groups. Partial Spearman rank order correlation coefficients between the KPAS and accelerometer were computed overall and by race/ethnic groups. Fisher’s z transformation-derived confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate differences in observed correlations in the various race/ethnic groups, compared to White women. Results: Participants spent an average of 7.5 ± 2.1 h·d−1 in sedentary behaviors, 4.5 ± 1.1 h·d−1 and 2.3 ± 0.8 h·d−1 in low or high light intensity physical activity, respectively, and 56 ± 35 min·d−1 in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. Time spent in each category differed by race/ethnic group. Overall, correlation coefficients comparing the KPAS domain-specific and total physical activity scores with accelerometry were low to moderate (range: 0.062–0.462), and few statistically significant differences in correlations were noted for race/ethnic groups, compared to White women. Conclusions: Study findings complement prior studies describing sedentary and physical activity behaviors using multi-methods in a diverse population of older women, and provide additional evidence on the convergent validity of the KPAS by race/ethnic groups.

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Brittney S. Lange-Maia, Jane A. Cauley, Anne B. Newman, Robert M. Boudreau, John M. Jakicic, Nancy W. Glynn, Sasa Zivkovic, Thuy-Tien L. Dam, Paolo Caserotti, Peggy M. Cawthon, Eric S. Orwoll, Elsa S. Strotmeyer, and for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Group

We determined whether sensorimotor peripheral nerve (PN) function was associated with physical activity (PA) in older men. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study Pittsburgh, PA, site (n = 328, age 78.8 ± 4.7 years) conducted PN testing, including: peroneal motor and sural sensory nerve conduction (latencies, amplitudes: CMAP and SNAP for motor and sensory amplitude, respectively), 1.4g/10g monofilament (dorsum of the great toe), and neuropathy symptoms. ANOVA and multivariate linear regression modeled PN associations with PA (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly [PASE] and SenseWear Armband). After multivariable adjustment, better motor latency was associated with higher PASE scores (160.5 ± 4.8 vs. 135.6 ± 6.7, p < .01). Those without versus with neuropathy symptoms had higher PASE scores (157.6 ± 5.3 vs. 132.9 ± 7.1, p < .01). Better versus worse SNAP was associated with slightly more daily vigorous activity (9.5 ± 0.8 vs. 7.3 ± 0.7, p = .05). Other PN measures were not associated with PA. Certain PN measures were associated with lower PA, suggesting a potential pathway for disability.