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  • Author: Bruce M. Gansneder x
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Damien M. Hess, Christopher J. Joyce, Brent L. Arnold and Bruce M. Gansneder

Context:

Agility training has been proposed as an important tool in rehabilitation. However, it is unclear which types of agility training are most useful.

Objective:

To assess the effects of agility training on balance in individuals with functionally unstable ankles.

Design:

A 2-group experimental design with repeated measures.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Patients:

Twenty college-aged volunteers, each with 1 functionally unstable ankle, were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups.

Interventions:

Subjects in the experimental group performed agility training 3 times per week for 4 weeks.

Main Outcome Measures:

Subjects were tested for static single-leg balance before and after the training period. Anterior/posterior sway amplitude, medial/lateral sway amplitude, and sway index were assessed using the Chattex Balance System.

Results:

No significant differences in balance were found after the agility training.

Conclusions:

Agility training did not improve static single-leg balance in subjects with functionally unstable ankles.

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Joshua M. Drouin, Peggy A. Houglum, David H. Perrin and Bruce M. Gansneder

Objective:

To determine the relationship between weight-bearing (WB) and non-weight-bearing (NWB) joint reposition sense (JRS) and a functional hop test (FH) and to compare performance on these parameters between athletes and nonathletes.

Design:

Repeated-measures ANOVA and Pearson correlations.

Setting:

Research laboratory.

Participants:

40 men (age = 20.8 ± 1.7 y; ht = 176.9 ± 5.8 cm; wt = 82.6 ± 9.5 kg): 20 lacrosse players and 20 nonathletes.

Main Outcome Measures:

Ability to actively reproduce 30° of knee flexion in the WB and NWB conditions and functional performance on a single-leg crossover-hop test.

Results:

No significant correlations were observed between JRS and FH in athletes and nonathletes. No significant differences were observed between athletes and nonathletes in JRS. All participants were significantly more accurate at WB than at NWB JRS.

Conclusions:

There appears to be no relationship between WB or NWB JRS and functional performance, regardless of one’s physical activity level

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Michele A. Parker and Bruce M. Gansneder

Column-editor : Michael G. Dolan

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Joseph E. Szczerba, Julie N. Bernier, David H. Perrin and Bruce M. Gansneder

The purpose of this study was to estimate intertester reliability of active and passive ankle joint position sense measurements in uninjured subjects. Subjects were 10 males and 10 females. Active and passive ankle joint position sense was assessed by two testers. Each subject was positioned supine on a modified examination table with his or her ankle placed in 25° of plantar flexion. Joint position sense (IPS) measurements, on two separate occasions, were recorded in degrees of error from four predetermined test positions. Test order was counterbalanced according to mode (active/passive) and test position. Two trials were performed for each sequence and the average of the two was recorded for analysis. The results revealed that both the active and passive JPS protocols yielded poor to moderate intertester reliability. It was concluded that further research is needed to develop reliable protocols for testing joint position sense of the ankle joint.

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Carl G. Mattacola, David H. Perrin, Bruce M. Gansneder, Jennifer D. Allen and Cheryl A. Mickey

This study evaluated a visual analog scale (VAS) and a graphic rating scale (GRS) for the measurement of pain following delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and following treatment for the symptoms of DOMS. Data from two studies were used to evaluate the scales. Pain intensity was assessed prior to and following induction of DOMS and immediately before and after each treatment session. In Study 1, subjects were randomly assigned to receive a 20-min ice pack followed by a 7-min sham ultrasound treatment or a 20-min ice pack followed by a 7-min nonthermal ultrasound treatment. In Study 2, subjects received a 20-rain microcurrent neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) treatment or a 20-min sham MENS treatment. In both studies, significant differences were found between the VAS and GRS scales for pretest conditions on Days 1 and 2 for all subjects. There were no significant differences between any other days or tests. The differences on Day 1 and Day 2 were attributed to the novelty of filling out the scales. Therefore, a. visual analog or graphic rating scale can be used to evaluate pain intensity following DOMS when repeated measurement is involved, although consideration should be given to potential differences the first one or two times the scales are completed.