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  • Author: Bruna Camilo Turi-Lynch x
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Ítalo Ribeiro Lemes, Xuemei Sui, Bruna Camilo Turi-Lynch, Steven N. Blair, Rômulo Araújo Fernandes, Jamile Sanches Codogno and Henrique Luiz Monteiro

The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal association between television (TV) viewing and all-cause mortality in older adults with hypertension. Sedentary behavior, physical activity, hypertension, and other chronic diseases were assessed by face-to-face interviews and confirmed by medical history. Mortality was reported by relatives and confirmed in medical records of the National Health System. The fully adjusted model showed a direct association between high TV viewing time and all-cause mortality; hazard ratio: 1.65 (95% confidence interval [1.02–2.68]). Women with high TV viewing were more likely to die than men. Higher TV viewing time was associated with all-cause mortality among those with diabetes and hypertension; hazard ratio: 3.54 (95% confidence interval [1.64–7.66]). The findings from this longitudinal study show that higher TV viewing time is associated with higher risk for all-cause mortality among older adults with hypertension, independently of physical activity, and other potential confounders.

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Alessandra Madia Mantovani, Manoel Carlos Spiguel de Lima, Luis Alberto Gobbo, Enio Ricardo Vaz Ronque, Marcelo Romanzini, Bruna Camilo Turi-Lynch, Jamile Sanches Codogno and Rômulo Araújo Fernandes

Purpose: To analyze the relationship between engagement in sports in early life and bone variables among adults of both sexes. Methods: The sample was composed of 225 men and women. Demographic data were collected, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to assess bone mineral density, bone mineral content, and lean soft tissue. Sports participation in early life was assessed by an interview including childhood and adolescence. Consumption of tobacco and alcohol was also assessed by interview and the habitual physical activity level by a pedometer. Results: Inactive men had bone mineral content around 11% lower than active men in childhood or adolescence, whereas for women, this difference represented around 14%. Active men had 74% less fat mass than inactive men in early life, and the difference was 67% for women. Early sports participation explained the differences in whole-body bone mineral content (16.8%, P-value = .005) and bone mineral density (8.8%, P-value = .015), as well as bone mineral density in lower limbs (18.9%, P-value = .001) among women. Conclusion: Adults engaged in sports in early life have higher bone mass than their inactive peers, especially women.

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Ítalo Ribeiro Lemes, Xuemei Sui, Stacy L. Fritz, Paul F. Beattie, Carl J. Lavie, Bruna Camilo Turi-Lynch and Steven N. Blair

Background: To investigate the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all-cause mortality in men with musculoskeletal conditions. Methods: Participants were 12,728 men (mean age 47.0 [9.3] y) with a history of musculoskeletal conditions (including joint pain, low back pain, stiff joints, arthritis, osteoporosis, or gout) and were followed for all-cause mortality to December 31, 2003. Fitness was quantified by maximal treadmill exercise test and was categorized for analysis as low, moderate, and high performance. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: Overall, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for mortality across incremental fitness categories were 1.00 (reference), 0.45 (0.30–0.68) and 0.35 (0.22–0.53), linear trend P < .01 for all-cause, 0.50 (0.23–1.10) and 0.29 (0.12–0.71), linear trend P = .02 for cardiovascular disease, and 0.38 (0.20–0.74) and 0.40 (0.20–0.80), linear trend P = .01 for cancer mortality. Conclusion: Among men with musculoskeletal conditions, higher fitness is associated with lower risk of death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, or any cause, independent of other risk factors.