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Bryan McCullick

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Mark Byra and Bryan McCullick

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Bryan McCullick and Mark Byra

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Bryan A. McCullick

This study examined practicing teachers’ perspectives on the requisite characteristics needed for participants in PETE. Eighteen physical educators were interviewed. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed, and the data were analyzed using analytic induction, which allowed the researcher to draw themes and commonalities from participant answers. Interpretivism and teacher socialization theories were used to analyze and understand the data. Dominant themes emerging from this study were that undergraduates should have a love for physical activity, should like children and people, be physically fit, and be flexible. The teachers also believed that a teacher educator’s effectiveness in preparing future physical educators depended on being credible, displaying a love for physical activity, and having concern for undergraduates and their development as teachers. Finally, themes emerging specific to characteristics of cooperating teachers included commitment to the profession, displaying effectiveness as teachers, and embodying personal characteristics such as honesty and adaptability. This study is significant in that it provides evidence of a shared technical culture in physical education, gives teacher educators valuable input as to the type of student who would likely be a good physical education teacher, and gives voice to those who teach physical education in an area in which they should be intimately familiar—the preparation of a teacher for public school.

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Karen Lux and Bryan A. McCullick

The purpose of this study was to analyze how one exceptional elementary physical education teacher navigated her working environment as the teacher of a marginal subject. Structuration Theory (Giddens, 1984) was used to make meaning of how the teacher functioned within her school community allowing her to remain motivated and effective. Data collection involved approximately 300 hr in the school setting involving observation and field notes, interviews, and critical incident (Flanagan, 1954) reports. Data trustworthiness was established through triangulation, member checks and a peer debriefer. Inductive analysis (Huberman & Miles, 1994) of the data generated themes pertaining to Structuration Theory. Analysis revealed that the teacher navigated marginality using four strategies. Implications for teacher preparation are discussed.

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Nilo C. Ramos and Bryan A. McCullick

The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary students’ perceptions of PE teacher credibility. Eight high- and low-skilled students from grades 3 and 5 were selected from a school employing a PE teacher holding a National Board Certification. Data were collected in the school setting utilizing observations, field notes, an open-ended questionnaire, student drawings, a photo elicitation activity, and group and individual interviews. Data were analyzed inductively and deductively using Miles and Huberman’s (1994) four-stage analysis in relation to source credibility theory (Hovland, Janis, & Kelley, 1953). Data trustworthiness was ensured through a peer debriefer, reflexivity journal/audit trail and triangulation. In the eyes of the students, a credible PE teacher “Looks Like One,” “Practices What She Preaches,” and “Is an ‘Awesome’ Pedagogue.” Implications for both current PE teachers and PETE programs concerned with teacher effectiveness and, consequently, student learning are discussed.

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Bryan A. McCullick, Ashton Dooley, Paul Schempp, and Tiffany Isaac

The Coaching Model theorized that coaching consists of three primary components: (a) training, (b) competition, and (c) organization. Unfortunately, researchers’ attention to the organization component has been scant compared with the keen focus given to training and competition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the organizational: (a) structure and (b) roles and responsibilities of an elite-level basketball coaching staff. The study employed a case study approach, utilizing interviews, observations, and artifacts as data sources. Data analysis identified the organizational structure as bureaucratic, or functional, in nature as (a) there was a clear chain of command, (b) roles and responsibilities were assigned based on staff member expertise, and (c) staff members had similar skill sets that allowed for easy communication and role overlap. Organizational roles were “Delegator,” “Recruiter,” and “Promoter.” Results provide insights into the manifestation of the organizational component among a staff, an exemplar of a staff managing the complexity of coaching, and support for the contention that coaching involves more than being the traditional teacher/psychologist.