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David C. Nieman, Giuseppe Valacchi, Laurel M. Wentz, Francesca Ferrara, Alessandra Pecorelli, Brittany Woodby, Camila A. Sakaguchi, and Andrew Simonson

This double-blinded, placebo controlled, randomized crossover trial investigated the influence of 2-week mixed flavonoid versus placebo supplementation on oxinflammation markers after a 75-km cycling time trial in 22 cyclists (42.3 ± 1.7 years). Blood samples were collected before and after the 2-week supplementation, and then 0 hr, 1.5 hr, and 21 hr post 75-km cycling (176 ± 5.4 min, 73.4 ±2.0% maximal oxygen consumption). The supplement provided 678-mg flavonoids with quercetin (200 mg), green tea catechins (368 mg, 180-mg epigallocatechin gallate), and anthocyanins (128 mg) from bilberry extract, with caffeine, vitamin C, and omega-3 fatty acids added as adjuvants. Blood samples were analyzed for blood leukocyte counts, oxinflammation biomarkers, including 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and peripheral blood mononuclear mRNA expression for cyclooxygenease-2 and glutathione peroxidase. Each of the blood biomarkers was elevated postexercise (time effects, all ps < .01), with lower plasma levels for 4-hydroxynonenal (at 21-hr postexercise) in flavonoid versus placebo (interaction effect, p = .008). Although elevated postexercise, no trial differences for the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (p = .539) or peripheral blood mononuclear mRNA expression for cyclooxygenease-2 (p = .322) or glutathione peroxidase (p = .839) were shown. Flavonoid supplementation prior to intensive exercise decreased plasma peroxidation and oxidative damage, as determined by 4-hydroxynonenal. Postexercise increases were similar between the flavonoid and placebo trials for peripheral blood mononuclear mRNA expression for cyclooxygenease-2 and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 related gene glutathione peroxidase (NFE2L2). The data support the strategy of flavonoid supplementation to mitigate postexercise oxidative stress in endurance athletes.

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Patricia Rehder-Santos, Raphael M. Abreu, Étore De F. Signini, Claudio D. da Silva, Camila A. Sakaguchi, Carla C. Dato, and Aparecida M. Catai

Background and Objective: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) produced outstanding results in the physical performance of active subjects; however, little is known about the best training intensity for this population. The objective was to investigate the impact of an IMT of high intensity, using the critical inspiratory pressure (CIP), on inspiratory muscle strength (IMS), inspiratory muscle endurance (IME), peak power, and oxygen uptake of recreational cyclists; and to compare these results with moderate-intensity IMT (60% of maximal inspiratory pressure [MIP]). Methods: Thirty apparently healthy male recreational cyclists, 20–40 years old, underwent 11 weeks of IMT (3 times per week; 55 min per session). Participants were randomized into 3 groups: sham group (6 cmH2O; n = 8); 60% MIP (MIP60; n = 10) and CIP (n = 12). All participants performed the IMS test and incremental IME test at the first, fifth, ninth, and 13th weeks of the experimental protocol. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed on an electromagnetic braking cycle ergometer pre-IMT and post-IMT. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA (group and period factors). Results: IMS increased in CIP and MIP60 groups at the ninth and 13th weeks compared with the sham group (P < .001; β = 0.99). Regarding IME, there was an interaction between the CIP and MIP60 groups in all periods, except in the initial evaluation (P < .001; β = 1.00). Peak power (in watts) increased after IMT in CIP and MIP60 groups (P = .01; β = 0.67). Absolute oxygen uptake did not increase after IMT (P = .49; β = 0.05). Relative oxygen uptake to lean mass values did not change significantly (P = .48; β = 0.05). Conclusion: High-intensity IMT is beneficial on IMS, IME, and peak power, but does not provide additional gain to moderate intensity in recreational cyclists.