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Edited by Carl G. Mattacola

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Carl G. Mattacola

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Edited by Carl G. Mattacola

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Carl G. Mattacola

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Column-editor : Carl G. Mattacola

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Jenny Toonstra and Carl G. Mattacola

Context: Physicians and clinicians need portable, efficient, and cost-effective assessment tools to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs after knee injury. Progress in rehabilitation should be evaluated using valid and reliable measurement methods. Objective: To examine the test-retest reliability of portable fixed dynamometry (PFD), handheld dynamometry (HHD), and isokinetic dynamometry (IKD). In addition, the authors sought to examine the validity of PFD and HHD by comparing differences in peak torque of the knee flexors and extensors to that of the "gold standard" IKD. Design: Repeated measures. Participants: 16 healthy subjects (age 29.3 ± 7.2 y, height 167.4 ± 8.04 cm, mass 73.7 ± 20.0 kg). Main Outcome Measures: The dependent variables were trial (trial 1, trial 2) and instrument (IKD, PFD, and HHD). Results: Test-retest reliability was high for both PFD and IKD. However, fair to poor reliability was found for HHD. There were no differences in peak torque (Nm) between IKD and PFD. However, significant differences in peak torque were observed between IKD and HHD and between PFD and HHD. Conclusions: PFD provides reliable measures of strength and also demonstrates similar output measures as IKD. Its portability, ease of use, and cost provide clinicians an effective means of measuring strength.

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Carl G. Mattacola and Christopher Higgins

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Carl G. Mattacola and Lori L. Rice

Context:

Dissemination of information regarding the latest research findings in rehabilitative health care is often limited to professional journals.

Objective:

The purpose of the paper is to describe opportunities to better distribute scientific information to wider swaths than normally contained within a readership of a journal, to describe a process to deliver important information via the Cooperative Extension Service, and provide an example of such an informational brochure.

Design:

An interdisciplinary approach was developed to provide access to a larger cohort of individuals the latest research findings regarding heat and hydration.

Data Extraction:

CINAHL, Medline, and Sport Discus were reviewed from 1966 to 2006 using the terms Heat, Hydration, Rhabdomyolysis, Rehabilitation, Heat Exhaustion, Heat Stroke, and Dehydration.

Data Synthesis:

We found substantial information describing recommendations for preventing, recognizing, and treating illness due to variance in heat and hydration. The information was succinctly summarized, converted to a 7th grade reading level, and shared with a larger audience via a unique model available through Cooperative Extension Agencies.

Conclusion:

Providing scientific information via a Cooperative Extension Model enables sharing of information from experts to communities. This methodology increases the distribution of the latest scientific knowledge to broader audiences.

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Thomas H. Kelly and Carl G. Mattacola

Context:

The National Institutes of Health's Clinical and Translational Science Award initiative is designed to establish and promote academic centers of clinical and translational science (CTS) that are empowered to train and advance multi- and interdisciplinary investigators and research teams to apply new scientific knowledge and techniques to enhance patient care. Among the key components of a full-service center for CTS is an educational platform to support research training in CTS. Educational objectives and resources available to support the career development of the clinical and translational scientists, including clinical research education, mentored research training, and career development support, are described.

Objective:

The purpose of the article is to provide an overview of the CTS educational model so that rehabilitation specialists can become more aware of potential resources that are available and become more involved in the delivery and initiation of the CTS model in their own workplace. Rehabilitation clinicians and scientists are well positioned to play important leadership roles in advancing the academic mission of CTS. Rigorous academic training in rehabilitation science serves as an effective foundation for supporting the translation of basic scientific discovery into improved health care. Rehabilitation professionals are immersed in patient care, familiar with interdisciplinary health care delivery, and skilled at working with multiple health care professionals.

Conclusion:

The NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award initiative is an excellent opportunity to advance the academic development of rehabilitation scientists.