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Carl Mattacola

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Co-editor : Carl Mattacola

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Carl G. Mattacola

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Carl G. Mattacola

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Cale Jacobs and Carl Mattacola

Context:

Decelerating movements such as landing from a jump have been proposed to be a common mechanism of injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).

Objective:

To compare eccentric hip-abductor strength and kinematics of landing between men and women when performing a hopping task.

Setting:

Research laboratory.

Patients:

18 healthy subjects (10 women, 8 men).

Main Outcome Measures:

Eccentric peak torque of the hip abductors and peak knee-joint angles during a 350-millisecond interval after impact.

Results:

No significant sex differences were present, but there was a significant inverse relationship between women's eccentric peak torque and peak knee-valgus angle (r = –.61, P = .03).

Conclusions:

Women with larger eccentric peak torque demonstrated lower peak knee-valgus angles. By not reaching as large of a valgus angle, there is potentially less stress on the ACL. Increasing eccentric hip-abductor strength might improve knee-joint kinematics during landing from a jump.

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Edited by Carl G. Mattacola

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Edited by Carl G. Mattacola

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Column-editor : Carl G. Mattacola

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Jenny Toonstra and Carl G. Mattacola

Context: Physicians and clinicians need portable, efficient, and cost-effective assessment tools to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs after knee injury. Progress in rehabilitation should be evaluated using valid and reliable measurement methods. Objective: To examine the test-retest reliability of portable fixed dynamometry (PFD), handheld dynamometry (HHD), and isokinetic dynamometry (IKD). In addition, the authors sought to examine the validity of PFD and HHD by comparing differences in peak torque of the knee flexors and extensors to that of the "gold standard" IKD. Design: Repeated measures. Participants: 16 healthy subjects (age 29.3 ± 7.2 y, height 167.4 ± 8.04 cm, mass 73.7 ± 20.0 kg). Main Outcome Measures: The dependent variables were trial (trial 1, trial 2) and instrument (IKD, PFD, and HHD). Results: Test-retest reliability was high for both PFD and IKD. However, fair to poor reliability was found for HHD. There were no differences in peak torque (Nm) between IKD and PFD. However, significant differences in peak torque were observed between IKD and HHD and between PFD and HHD. Conclusions: PFD provides reliable measures of strength and also demonstrates similar output measures as IKD. Its portability, ease of use, and cost provide clinicians an effective means of measuring strength.