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Dorothy J. Lovett and Carla D. Lowry

Two reasons given for the dramatic decline in the percentage of women coaches since the passage of Title IX have been the effectiveness of the “good old boys” network and the lack or ineffectiveness of the “good old girls” network. With homologous reproduction used as a theoretical basis for these networks, 1,106 public secondary schools were surveyed to determine their administrative structures based on the sex of the principals and the athletic directors. Two types of administrative structures were identified with four models under each type. The numbers of male and female head coaches in the girls' athletics program under each administrative structure were determined and analyzed for independence. Significant differences were found between the different administrative models and the gender of the head coaches. Findings are discussed in terms of the prevailing administrative structures and the representation of females in coaching as a result of the dominant group reproducing itself.

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Dorothy J. Lovett and Carla D. Lowry

This study sought to describe the degree of success of a basic tenet of liberal feminism in providing equal opportunity as defined by female representation in the NCAA. The study showed how the NCAA is reflective of an association that is an instrument of domination. The purpose of the study was to determine the number of women holding leadership positions at the campus level in NCAA labeled functions. These data were compared with similar 1987-88 data. In addition, male and female representatives at the national level on committees and councils were compared to similar data collected in 1987-88. A gender comparison was made with the 1992-93 data involving NCAA national committees. The data revealed that there were significantly more males than females on NCAA national committees in 1992-93. The results of χ2 tests between years and female representation revealed no significant increase in female representation between 1987 and 1993; however, there was an increase in female representation beyond the mandated percentage required by NCAA bylaws.

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Dorothy J. Lovett and Carla D. Lowry

The purpose of this paper is to present a historical overview of the role of women in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) since the demise of the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW). The paper traces the reluctance of some men and women to form this uneasy alliance. The paper presents evidence showing that the NCAA recognizes that women's athletics are part of the organization and that they deserve recognition and concern. However, the paper also shows that when substantive changes in the NCAA appeared imminent and the degree of recognition approached proportional equity, the pervasive and strong loyalty to the status quo quelled any proactive legislation that might include equal voice for reform in the organization.