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  • Author: Catherine A. Stevermer x
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Catherine A. Stevermer and Jason C. Gillette

Variation in the timing indicators separating sit-to-stand (STS) into movement phases complicates both research comparisons and clinical applications. The purpose of this study was to use kinetic reference standards to identify accurate kinematic and kinetic indicators for STS movement analysis such that consistent indicators might be used for STS from varied initial postures. Healthy adults performed STS using 4 foot placements: foot-neutral, foot-back, right-staggered, and left-staggered. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected from force platforms and an 8-camera video system. Initiation, seat-off, vertical posture, and termination were detected with 5% start and 7.5% end thresholds for changes in kinetic and kinematic STS indicators. Timing differences between kinetic and kinematic indicator time points and the reference vertical seated reaction force end point (seatoff) were determined. Kinematic indicators were compared with selected kinetic indicators using timing differences, statistical similarity, and internal consistency measures. Our results suggest that a single force platform system measuring vertical GRF or a simple camera system to evaluate the shoulder marker position and velocity can accurately and consistently detect STS initiation, seat-off, and vertical posture. In addition, these suggested STS indicators for initiation, seat-off, and vertical posture were not dependent upon foot placement.

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Jason C. Gillette, Catherine A. Stevermer, Stacey A. Meardon, Timothy R. Derrick and Charles V. Schwab

Farm youth commonly perform animal care tasks such as feeding and watering. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age, bucket size, loading symmetry, and amount of load on upper body moments during carrying tasks. Fifty-four male and female participants in four age groups (8–10 years, 12–14 years, 15–17 years, and adults, 20–26 years) participated in the study. Conditions included combinations of large or small bucket sizes, unilateral or bilateral loading, and load levels of 10% or 20% of body weight (BW). During bucket carrying, elbow flexion, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, L5/S1 extension, L5/S1 lateral bending, and L5/S1 axial rotation moments were estimated using video data. The 8–10 year-old group did not display higher proportional joint moments as compared with adults. Decreasing the load from 20% BW to 10% BW significantly decreased maximum normalized elbow flexion, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, L5/S1 lateral bending, and L5/S1 axial rotation moments. Carrying the load bilaterally instead of unilaterally also significantly reduced these six maximum normalized joint moments. In addition, modifying the carrying task by using smaller one-gallon buckets produced significant reductions in maximum L5/S1 lateral bending moments.

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Jason C. Gillette, Catherine A. Stevermer, Ross H. Miller, W. Brent Edwards and Charles V. Schwab

Farm youth often carry loads that are proportionally large and/or heavy, and field measurements have determined that these tasks are equivalent to industrial jobs with high injury risks. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age, load amount, and load symmetry on lower extremity joint moments during carrying tasks. Three age groups (8–10 years, 12–14 years, adults), three load amounts (0%, 10%, 20% BW), and three load symmetry levels (unilateral large bucket, unilateral small bucket, bilateral small buckets) were tested. Inverse dynamics was used to determine maximum ankle, knee, and hip joint moments. Ankle dorsiflexion, ankle inversion, ankle eversion, knee adduction, and hip extension moments were significantly higher in 8–10 and 12–14 year olds. Ankle plantar flexion, ankle inversion, knee extension, and hip extension moments were significantly increased at 10% and 20% BW loads. Knee and hip adduction moments were significantly increased at 10% and 20% BW loads when carrying a unilateral large bucket. Of particular concern are increased ankle inversion and eversion moments for children, along with increased knee and hip adduction moments for heavy, asymmetrical carrying tasks. Carrying loads bilaterally instead of unilaterally avoided increases in knee and hip adduction moments with increased load amount.