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Adam G. Pfleegor and Chad S. Seifried

The debate between building new sport and recreation facilities or renovating existing venues has engrossed sport managers (Barghchi, Omar, & Aman, 2009; Galvan, 2006; Grant-Long, 2005; Rosentraub & Ijla, 2008; Seifried, 2010). Interestingly, the individuals entrusted with making investment decisions on these facilities often lack knowledge of this process. Many sport management programs include courses related to facility management; however, they rarely include curriculum items on the renovation of culturally valuable sport and recreation buildings. The main purpose of this paper is to propose heritage management as an important component to sport and recreational facility management and to showcase an example of this initiative that was incorporated into a facility management class. This teaching methodology on heritage management allows students to understand how to create valuable contributions to their field while simultaneously learning about the culture and history of sport venues.

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Per G. Svensson and Chad S. Seifried

Sport leaders are redefining organizational paradigms by blending elements from traditional forms of organizing. Leaders of emergent hybrid forms face unique challenges in managing tensions associated with the paradoxical elements they embody. This paper introduces the concept of hybrid organizing and examines its applicability to Sport for Development and Peace (SDP). Specifically, Battilana and Lee’s (2014) multidimensional framework is used to examine the core practices, workforce composition, organizational design, interorganizational relationships, and organizational culture of hybrid SDP entities. Findings from this exploratory empirical work with nine organizations indicate SDP hybrids operate under a multitude of legal structures yet are underlined by shared beliefs that these new forms provide better opportunities for achieving social impact and organizational sustainability. Organizational leaders appear to use a multitude of internal mechanisms for managing the seemingly paradoxical nature of hybrid organizing. Strengths and challenges associated with these efforts were revealed and are critically examined.

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Matthew T. Bowers, B. Christine Green and Chad S. Seifried

Founders of the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM) set out to realize a future in which the management of sport was part of a broader vision that included exercise, dance and play. However, the organization quickly became untethered from this broad interpretation of sport management. In this mixedmethod historical research and Delphi study, 10 founding members of NASSM explain the underlying reasons why NASSM leaders redirected the organization’s focus over time. Drawing from the literature on institutional legitimacy as a lens to understand the development of NASSM, the findings suggest an emphasis on commercial sport emerged over that of exercise, dance, and play. This emphasis was perceived to offer a more sustainable niche within the crowded sport and physical activity academic society continuum. Shaped by market- and culture-driven processes, NASSM’s legitimacy-seeking efforts ultimately catalyzed a narrowing of the organization’s scope.

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Khirey B. Walker, Chad S. Seifried and Brian P. Soebbing

The present study focuses on the National Collegiate Athletic Association and cases of misconduct from 1953 to 2016 to examine evidence of organizational layering created by social-control agents. The historical method was employed and found wrongdoing may influence the creation of organizational layers to control and/or manage future behavior. Furthermore, the activities of the National Collegiate Athletic Association featured variation in centralization, formalization, and complexity through expanding horizontal; vertical (e.g., institutional, managerial, and technical); and spatial differentiations. Second, individual social-control agents impact future organizational policies and member behavior but social-control agents’ power may be challenged as an organization grows. Third, as a social-control agent, the National Collegiate Athletic Association struggled with assessing cases of misconduct, assigning sanctions in a timely manner and at a level to deter future wrongdoing. Finally, the present study offers several propositions connecting third-party regulators to the synergy between complexity (i.e., horizontal and vertical differentiations); formalization; and centralization.

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Khirey Walker, Brian P. Soebbing, Chad S. Seifried and Adam G. Pfleegor

Finisher Sports went from a small business to one of the top sports apparel businesses in the United States under the leadership of its founder, George Taylor. After declaring bankruptcy, Taylor sold the business to Carol Anthony, President and CEO of Star Brand Group. Since the purchase, the Star Brand Group believed that Finisher Sports had not realized its full revenue potential. Thus, Anthony organized a think tank to devise solutions. The purpose of the case study is for students, as the members of the think tank, to examine Finisher sports from marketing and organizational behavior perspectives, particularly focusing on the role that the company’s history plays in the marketing and strategic components of the company.