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Chris Barnhill and Mauro Palmero

Wisconsin State University (WSU) is on the verge of receiving an invitation to join the Mid-Atlantic Conference (a conference with Football Bowl Subdivision [FBS] status). To successfully transition to FBS, WSU needs its students to approve a fee increase to offset the additional costs. Alex Pence, the assistant director of marketing, has been placed in charge of developing a marketing plan to influence students to support the fee increase. Unfortunately for Pence, WSU students have a history of opposing fees for athletics. With pressure from the school’s administration, Pence must figure out how create support for the move while balancing the ethical and political pressures he is facing.

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Chris Barnhill and Mauro Palmero

Mary Graham is the athletic director at Western Arkansas University (WAU), a successful Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) school that is about to receive an invitation to join a Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) conference. WAU’s Board of Regents has put the decision to join in her hands, but WAU’s president is pushing her to recommend accepting the invitation. Using details from a recently completed feasibility study and information from a professor in the sport management program, Graham must decide the future of her athletic program and university.

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Chad Seifried, Chris Barnhill and J. Michael Martinez

This study examined knowledge creation by faculty currently employed in North American sport management doctoral programs relative to program structure (i.e., integrated or traditional). Faculty curricula vitae were collected to ascertain average annual publications, presentations, and publications by student advisees. Publication data were subcategorized by publication quality and authorship level. The analysis revealed that faculty employed in doctoral programs with integrated structures annually produced more publications and published in higher quality journals at a greater rate than their colleagues in traditional sport management doctoral programs. Data also revealed that as a collective, sport management faculty and student advisees are publishing and presenting at significantly higher rates in the current decade than in years prior.