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Christine Stopka

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Christine Stopka

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Christine Boyd Stopka and Kimberly L. Zambito

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Jeff Fields, Milledge Murphey, MaryBeth Horodyski and Christine Stopka

The purpose of the present study was to identify factors that contribute to adherent or nonadherent behavior during sport injury rehabilitation programs. Thirty-nine male and female college-age recreational athletes participated. The variables under examination were self-motivation/apathy, perceived exertion, social support, scheduling concerns, the clinical environment, and pain tolerance. Independent t tests (p < .05) were used to determine the difference between the adherer and nonadherer groups on each of the six variables. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was employed to determine which of the six variables contributed most to the overall difference. Results of the t tests indicated that significant differences were seen for self-motivation, scheduling concerns, and pain tolerance. The DFA indicated that scheduling concerns contributed most to the overall group difference.

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Christine Stopka

Column-editor : G. Monique Butcher

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Christine Stopka

Column-editor : G. Monique Butcher

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Marybeth Horodyski, Paul Fiolkowski and Christine Stopka

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Michael A. Machek, Christine B. Stopka, Mark D. Tillman, Suzanne M. Sneed and Keith E. Naugle

Objective:

To examine the effects of a resistance-training program on athletes with intellectual disabilities (ID).

Design/Participants:

2-way (2 × 2), repeated-measures analysis of variance on 2 groups (males and females); 30 Special Olympics (SO) athletes, age 16–22 (16 males, 14 females).

Intervention/Outcome Measures:

Resistance training, twice per week, for 3 months on Med-X weight equipment. Exercises tested: chest press, abdominal crunch, seated row, overhead press, seated dip, lower back extension, and biceps curl. The weight lifted and the number of repetitions performed were used to determine predicted 1-repetition max (1RM).

Results:

All participants as a group increased significantly in predicted 1RM for each exercise performed. Males were stronger than females for 5 of the 7 exercises. A significant interaction effect between genders was demonstrated for the seated dip.

Conclusion:

Significant strength gains can be accomplished by adolescents with ID via a supervised resistance-training program.

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Christine Stopka, Kevin Morley, Ronald Siders, Josh Schuette, Ashley Houck and Yul Gilmet

Objective/Context:

To examine the effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching in Special Olympics athletes and their coaches on sit-and-reach performance.

Design/Participants:

Repeated-measures ANOVA with Scheffé post hoc analyses on 2 groups: Special Olympics athletes (n = 18, mean age = 15.7) and their coaches without mental retardation (n = 44, mean age = 22.2).

Intervention/Outcome Measures:

Stretching performance was measured in centimeters using a sit-and-reach flexibility box, examining 2 series of 3 stretches. For both groups, the first set of 3 stretches was performed in the following order: baseline, static, PNF. Three to 4 weeks later, the order of the stretches was reversed: baseline, PNF, static.

Results:

PNF stretching improved performance regardless of stretching order after baseline and static measures. Static stretching improved performance only from baseline.

Conclusions:

Individuals of various ages and cognitive abilities can apparently perform and benefit from PNF stretching.