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  • Author: Christopher Coutts x
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Christopher Coutts, Timothy Chapin, Mark Horner and Crystal Taylor

Background:

Parks and other forms of green space are among the key environmental supports for recreational physical activity. Measurements of green space access have provided mixed results as to the influence of green space access on physical activity.

Methods:

This cross-sectional study uses a geographical information system (GIS) to examine the relationships between the amount of and distance to green space and county-level (n = 67) moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in the state of Florida.

Results:

The gross amount of green space in a county (P < .05) and the amount of green space within defined distances of where people live (1/4 mile, P < .01; 1/2 mile, P < .05; 1 mile, P < .01) were positively associated with self-reported levels of MVPA. Distance to the nearest green space and the amount of green space furthest from where people live (10 miles) were not significantly associated with MVPA. All measures were weighted by the population living in census tracts.

Conclusions:

The results suggest that there is an association between the accessibility created by having more green space closer to home and MVPA, but this holds only for areas up to and including 1 mile from home.

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Mitchell J. Henderson, Bryna C.R. Chrismas, Christopher J. Stevens, Aaron J. Coutts and Lee Taylor

Purpose: To characterize player core temperature (Tc) across a World Rugby Women’s Sevens Series tournament day (WRWSS) and determine the efficacy of commonly employed cold-water-immersion (CWI) protocols. Methods: Tc was measured in 12 elite female rugby sevens athletes across 3 games (G1–3) from day 1 of the Sydney WRWSS tournament. Symptoms of exertional heat illness, perceptual scales, CWI details, playing minutes, external-load data (measured by global positioning systems), and wet-bulb globe temperature (range 18.5°C–20.1°C) were also collected. Linear mixed models and magnitude-based inferences were used to assess differences in Tc between periods (G1–3 and warm-ups [WU]). Results: Average Tc was “very likely” lower (effect size; ±90% confidence limit −0.33; ±0.18) in G1 than in G2. Peak Tc was “very likely” (0.71; ±0.28) associated with increased playing time. CWI did not remove the accumulated Tc due to WU and match-play activity (∼1°C–2°C rise in Tc still present compared with Tc at WU onset for players ≥6-min match play). Conclusions: Elite WRWSS athletes experienced high Tc during WU (Tc peak 37.9–39.0°C) and matches (Tc peak 37.9–39.8°C), a magnitude known to reduce intermittent high-intensity physical performance (≥39°C). The CWI protocol resulted in players (≥6-min match play) with ∼1°C to 2°C raised Tc compared with Tc at WU onset.

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Ademir F.S. Arruda, Christopher Carling, Vinicius Zanetti, Marcelo S. Aoki, Aaron J. Coutts and Alexandre Moreira

Purpose:

To analyze the effects of a very congested match schedule on the total distance (TD) covered, high-intensity-running (HIR) distance, and frequency of accelerations and body-load impacts (BLIs) performed in a team of under-15 soccer players (N = 10; 15.1 ± 0.2 y, 171.8 ± 4.7 cm, 61 ± 6.0 kg) during an international youth competition.

Methods:

Using global positioning systems, player performances were repeatedly monitored in 5 matches performed over 3 successive days.

Results:

Significant differences were observed between matches (P < .05) for the frequency of accelerations per minute, BLIs, and BLIs per minute. No differences were observed for the TD covered, TD run per minute, number of high-intensity runs, distance covered in HIR, per-minute peak running speed attained, or frequency of accelerations. The frequency of accelerations per minute decreased across the competition while BLIs were higher during the final than in all other matches.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that BLIs and acceleration might be used as an alternative means to represent the external load during congested match schedules rather than measures related to running speed or distance covered.