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Coyte G. Cooper

Upon being hired as an assistant wrestling coach at a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I program, you have learned that your head coach has given you the task of spearheading the marketing efforts for the upcoming season. With little knowledge in this area, you have decided to apply to the National Wrestling Coaches Association (NWCA) Leadership Academy in August at their annual convention. After being accepted, you have learned that a primary emphasis of the academy is providing coaches with the skill sets necessary to be the CEO of their program. As you attend the different sessions at the academy, there are a variety of different traditional and new media marketing initiatives that are presented as potential strategies to grow programs at the local level. With a goal of increasing attendance and social media followers, you are now presented with the challenge of developing a plan to better market the program moving forward.

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Coyte G. Cooper and David Pierce

With the growing popularity of the Internet as a communication medium, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletic departments have turned to their Web sites to build interest in their product among consumers. As sites continue to develop traffic, it is important to examine the coverage being provided on the home Web pages to determine whether equitable coverage is being allocated to men’s and women’s nonrevenue sport teams. The current research featured a content analysis of NCAA divisional Web-site coverage during an academic school year. From a broad perspective, the results indicated that only Division III provided equitable gender and individual team coverage allocations on its home Web pages. In contrast, the data also supported the notion that Division I athletic programs (Football Bowl Subdivision [FBS] and Football Championship Subdivision [FCS]) provided significantly more coverage to men’s baseball, men’s basketball, and men’s football than nonrevenue-sport teams. The FBS and FCS coverage inequalities are discussed in depth in the article.

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Coyte G. Cooper and Richard M. Southall

Over the past few decades, college sport in the United States has increasingly adopted a commercial institutional logic when engaging in an athletics “arms race.” With decisions by some athletic directors to eliminate certain nonrevenue Olympic sport programs for spending reallocation, it stands to reason that programs such as men’s wrestling will need to enhance their revenue streams to remain viable in future years. The purpose of the study was to investigate the motivational preferences of online wrestling consumers (N = 451) to provide a core foundation for the development of strategies to enhance interest in the college-wrestling product. In addition to illustrating that online consumers responded most favorably to the sport-related wrestling motives, the data also supported the notion that the motivational preferences of consumers varied when focusing on the demographic information of participants.