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  • Author: Daniel A. Judelson x
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Daniela A. Rubin, Diobel M. Castner, Hoang Pham, Jason Ng, Eric Adams and Daniel A. Judelson

During childhood, varying exercise modalities are recommended to stimulate normal growth, development, and health. This project investigated hormonal and metabolic responses triggered by a resistance exercise protocol in lean children (age: 9.3 ± 1.4 y, body fat: 18.3 ± 4.9%), obese children (age: 9.6 ± 1.3 y, body fat: 40.3 ± 5.2%) and lean adults (age: 23.3 ± 2.4 y, body fat: 12.7 ± 2.9%). The protocol consisted of stepping onto a raised platform (height = 20% of stature) while wearing a weighted vest (resistance = 50% of lean body mass). Participants completed 6 sets of 10 repetitions per leg with a 1-min rest period between sets. Blood samples were obtained at rest preexercise, immediately postexercise and 2 times throughout the 1-hr recovery to analyze possible changes in hormones and metabolites. Children-adult differences included a larger exercise-induced norepinephrine increase in adults vs. children and a decrease in glucagon in children but not adults. Similarities between adults and children were observed for GH-IGF-1 axis responses. Metabolically, children presented with lower glycolytic and increased fat metabolism after exercise than adults did. Obesity in childhood negatively influenced GH, insulin, and glucose concentrations. While adults occasionally differed from children, amount of activated lean mass, not maturation, likely drove these dissimilarities.

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Andrea T. Duran, Erik Gertz, Daniel A. Judelson, Andrea M. Haqq, Susan J. Clark, Kavin W. Tsang and Daniela Rubin

Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), the best characterized form of syndromic obesity, presents with abnormally high fat mass. In children, obesity presents with low-grade systemic inflammation. This study evaluated if PWS and/or nonsyndromic obesity affected cytokine responses to intermittent aerobic exercise in children. Eleven children with PWS (11 ± 2 y, 45.4 ± 9.5% body fat), 12 children with obesity (OB) (9 ± 1 y, 39.9 ± 6.8% body fat), and 12 lean (LN) children (9 ± 1 y, 17.5 ± 4.6% body fat) participated. Children completed 10 2-min cycling bouts of vigorous intensity, separated by 1-min rest. Blood samples were collected preexercise (PRE), immediately postexercise (IP), and 15, 30, and 60 min into recovery to analyze possible changes in cytokines. In all groups, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were greater during recovery compared with PRE. PWS and OB exhibited higher IL-6 area under the curve (AUC) than LN (p < .01 for both). PWS demonstrated higher IL-8 AUC than LN (p < .04). IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ did not change with exercise (p > .05 for all). Results indicate that children with PWS respond with increased Il-6 and IL-8 concentrations to acute exercise similarly to controls. Excess adiposity and epigenetic modifications may explain the greater integrated IL-6 and IL-8 responses in PWS compared with controls.

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João C. Dias, Melissa W. Roti, Amy C. Pumerantz, Greig Watson, Daniel A. Judelson, Douglas J. Casa and Lawrence E. Armstrong

Context:

Dieticians, physiologists, athletic trainers, and physicians have recommended refraining from caffeine intake when exercising because of possible fluid-electrolyte imbalances and dehydration.

Objective:

To assess how 16-hour rehydration is affected by caffeine ingestion.

Design:

Dose–response.

Setting:

Environmental chamber.

Participants:

59 college-age men.

Intervention:

Subjects consumed a chronic caffeine dose of 0 (placebo), 3, or 6 mg · kg−1 · day−1 and performed an exercise heat-tolerance test (EHT) consisting of 90 minutes of walking on a treadmill (5.6 km/h) in the heat (37.7 °C).

Outcome Measures:

Fluid-electrolyte measures.

Results:

There were no between-group differences immediately after and 16 hours after EHT in total plasma protein, hematocrit, urine osmolality, specific gravity, color, and volume. Body weights after EHT and the following day (16 hours) were not different between groups (P > .05).

Conclusion:

Hydration status 16 hours after EHT did not change with chronic caffeine ingestion.

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Lawrence E. Armstrong, Amy C. Pumerantz, Melissa W. Roti, Daniel A. Judelson, Greig Watson, Joao C. Dias, Bülent Sökmen, Douglas J. Casa, Carl M. Maresh, Harris Lieberman and Mark Kellogg

This investigation determined if 3 levels of controlled caffeine consumption affected fluid-electrolyte balance and renal function differently. Healthy males (mean ± standard deviation; age, 21.6 ± 3.3 y) consumed 3 mg caffeine · kg−1 · d−1 on days 1 to 6 (equilibration phase). On days 7 to 11 (treatment phase), subjects consumed either 0 mg (C0; placebo; n = 20), 3 mg (C3; n = 20), or 6 mg (C6; n = 19) caffeine · kg−1 · d−1 in capsules, with no other dietary caffeine intake. The following variables were unaffected (P > 0.05) by different caffeine doses on days 1, 3, 6, 9, and 11 and were within normal clinical ranges: body mass, urineosmolality, urine specific gravity, urine color, 24-h urine volume, 24-h Na+ and K+ excretion, 24-h creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum Na+ and K+, serum osmolality, hematocrit, and total plasma protein. Therefore, C0, C3, and C6 exhibited no evidence of hypohydration. These findings question the widely accepted notion that caffeine consumption acts chronically as a diuretic.