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Daniel F. Mahony

Although sport management is now well established in higher education and is an increasingly popular major for students, there are a number of critical issues that face the discipline. The purpose of this lecture is to identify some of these critical issues and what can be done to address each of them. The primary issue for sport management is a lack of qualified faculty to (a) teach the increasing number of students enrolling in sport management programs and (b) conduct the research necessary to build a distinct body of knowledge. In addition, sport management faculty also need to work together to make a better case for the contributions of their programs to their respective universities to avoid being a very low priority in their home units. The lecture focuses on the need for sport management faculty to work together to address each of these issues.

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Daniel F. Mahony

Edited by Lucie Thibault

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Daniel F. Mahony and Brenda G. Pitts

While Weese recently recommended that JSM and NASSM become more practitioner-oriented, Cuneen and Parks argued that JSM and NASSM need to maintain a more theoretically-oriented approach. Further, Cuneen and Parks agreed with Weese's suggestion that a new practitioner-oriented journal could be developed in order to meet the current needs of practitioners and to provide opportunities for both types of research. The authors of this paper would like to go further and suggest that it is important to allow for both types of research within the various content areas. However, despite the popularity of sport marketing in North America, there is currently only one practitioner-oriented journal specializing in this area. The authors of this paper believe that there is an immediate need for a theoretical sport marketing journal that, together with the Sport Marketing Quarterly, will contribute to the development of this content area.

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Daniel F. Mahony and Dennis R. Howard

The purpose of this paper is to briefly look back at the sport industry in the 1990s and to make some predictions for the sport industry in the upcoming decade. The 1990s were particularly strong for the sport industry, exceeding the highly optimistic predictions made at the beginning of the decade (Rosner, 1989). However, the authors predict a general decline in the U.S. economy, which will certainly impact the sport industry. Because of a number of problems currently facing the sport industry, including increased competition, heavy debt, and poor relations with consumers, sport industry professionals will need to use some creative strategies in order to continue to thrive. Some of these strategies include taking advantage of new technology; exploiting the big events, rivalries, and stars; tapping new markets; improving targeting efforts; attempting to reconnect with traditional fans/consumers; using creative financing; cutting the budget more frequently; and increasing synergy.

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Daniel F. Mahony, Michael Mondello, Mary A. Hums and Michael Judd

The growth of sport management has led to concerns about the quantity and quality of candidates for faculty positions. In addition to trying to recruit recent doctoral graduates, many programs focus on recruiting established faculty members. This study examines factors affecting the willingness of sport management faculty to accept new positions, and the likelihood of leaving their current positions. While the likelihood of leaving was not high, objective factors such as salary and location were important to those willing to take a new position. Subjective factors such as fit within the program and quality of faculty in the program were also important, whereas several factors were less important (e.g., recruiter description, recruiter approach, and leadership opportunities). Results confirm that attracting faculty in sport management is challenging and universities must consider a combination of strategies to attract them.

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Ian S.C. Patrick, Daniel F. Mahony and Joseph M. Petrosko

Research has indicated that need-based distributions are often perceived to be the fairest method for distributing resources in intercollegiate athletics. Mahony, Hums, and Riemer (2005) examined definitions of need and identified 3 subprinciples: need because of lack of resources, need because of high operating expenses, and need to be competitively successful. The current study examined the perceived fairness of distributions based on these subprinciples of need, equality of treatment, and revenue production, as well as the differences in perceptions based on gender, NCAA division, and scenario. Although need because of lack of resources was consistently rated as fairer than most or all of the other distribution methods, perceptions of the other methods varied based on the scenario. Further analysis indicated that men were more likely to perceive revenue production as fair, whereas women preferred equality. In addition, Division I administrators were more likely to rate need to be competitively successful and revenue production as fair.

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Seong Hee Park, Daniel F. Mahony and T. Christopher Greenwell

Curiosity has been regarded as a key intrinsic motivational drive for facilitating human exploratory behaviors in many domains, such as psychology, education, and sport. However, no attempt has been made to measure curiosity in a sport context. The purpose of this study was to develop an effective and efficient sport fan exploratory curiosity scale (SFECS). A total of 657 participants were recruited and completed surveys. Various statistical analyses were used to examine the reliability and validity of the scale. The analyses resulted in a reliable and valid scale with three factors (Excitement, New Sport Events, Sport Facility) and a total of 10-items. The SFECS was useful in predicting various sport fan behaviors. Future research should be done in an effort to further refine the scale and to examine the role of curiosity in various practical areas in a sport context.

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Daniel F. Mahony, Mary A. Hums and Harold A. Riemer

Hums and Chelladurai (1994b) found NCAA coaches and administrators believed distributing resources based on equality and need was more just than distributing them based on equity (i.e., contribution). However, Mahony and Pastore (1998) found actual distributions, particularly at the NCAA Division I level, appear to be based on equity over equality and need. The main purpose of the current study was to determine why the findings in these studies differed. The authors of the current study reexamined the principles from Hums and Chelladurai's (1994b) study, while making significant changes in the sample examined, asking new questions, and adding more distribution options. The results indicated that need based principles were considered to be the most fair, but there was less support for equality than in prior research. In addition, the current study found differences between Division I and Division III administrators with regards to some equality and equity based principles.

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Daniel F. Mahony, Mary A. Hums and Harold A. Riemer

The distribution of resources in intercollegiate athletics has been controversial for many years. Prior research indicated various stakeholders believed need-based distributions were fair and were more likely to be used. It was not clear, however, how the stakeholders determined need or which sports had the greatest needs. The results of the current study indicate that athletic administrators believe programs need more resources when they lack resources, have high program costs, or lack adequate resources to be competitively successful. Although these three reasons were each identified by all groups, Division I administrators cited competitive success more often, and Division III administrators cited high program costs more often. The current study also found that football was the sport believed to have the greatest needs at both the NCAA Division I and Division III levels, and men’s sports were generally believed to have greater needs.

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Larena Hill, Lisa A. Kihl and Daniel F. Mahony

Edited by Lucie Thibault