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Jiabei Zhang, Daniel Joseph and Michael Horvat

The purpose was to investigate marketable features of the adapted physical education (APE) career in higher education. A total of 560 APE job openings (297 APE first priority and 263 APE second priority were identified from the Chronicle of Higher Education between 1975–1976 and 1997–1998. These data were analyzed by regression, chi-square, and descriptive statistics. The results indicate that the APE career is a growing employment market demanding candidates who specialize in APE to prepare in one or more other areas and encouraging candidates who specialize in other areas to minor in APE. The market shows that APE second priority openings increase more quickly than APE first priority openings. Personnel for the APE career in higher education appear to be in short supply.

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Jiabei Zhang, Debra Berkey, Luke Kelly, Daniel Joseph and Shihui Chen

The purpose was to develop a method for projecting the need for adapted physical education (APE) teachers in the public schools in the United States. This method was derived from a prevalence-based model—dividing the number of APE students enrolled by the APE student-teacher ratio and then subtracting the number of APE teachers hired. This model used the findings of Kelly and Gansneder (1998) that (a) 4% of the school population required APE services and (b) the overall national APE student-teacher ratio was 104:1. The results revealed a need for 22, 116 additional APE teachers nationwide as well as specific projections for each state. The prevalence-based projection method is recommended for policy makers at local, state, and national levels; for APE advocates; and for all concerned with APE personnel preparation and employment.

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Shihui Chen, Ernest Lange, Paul Miko, Jiabei Zhang and Daniel Joseph

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the progressive time delay (PTD) procedure on teaching gross motor skills to adult males with severe mental retardation. A multiple probe design across three skills and replicated across 4 participants was utilized. Results indicated that a PTD procedure with a 0 to 5 s delay was effective in teaching 4 participants three gross motor skills (tee-ball batting, softball pitching, croquet striking) over a period of 13 weeks. Data on effectiveness were analyzed in terms of the number of instructional sessions (M = 9.58), the number of trials (M = 105.41), the number of min (M = 84.66), and the number of performing errors to criterion (M = 4.08%). A maintenance level (M = 96.87%) was also determined across 4 participants and three skills on the 1st, 4th, 14th, and 24th sessions after terminating the PTD instruction.

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Ian S.C. Patrick, Daniel F. Mahony and Joseph M. Petrosko

Research has indicated that need-based distributions are often perceived to be the fairest method for distributing resources in intercollegiate athletics. Mahony, Hums, and Riemer (2005) examined definitions of need and identified 3 subprinciples: need because of lack of resources, need because of high operating expenses, and need to be competitively successful. The current study examined the perceived fairness of distributions based on these subprinciples of need, equality of treatment, and revenue production, as well as the differences in perceptions based on gender, NCAA division, and scenario. Although need because of lack of resources was consistently rated as fairer than most or all of the other distribution methods, perceptions of the other methods varied based on the scenario. Further analysis indicated that men were more likely to perceive revenue production as fair, whereas women preferred equality. In addition, Division I administrators were more likely to rate need to be competitively successful and revenue production as fair.

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Joseph S. Parry, Rachel Straub and Daniel J. Cipriani

Context:

The Bodyblade Pro is used for shoulder rehabilitation after injury. Resistance is provided by blade oscillations—faster oscillations or higher speeds correspond to greater resistance. However, research supporting the Bodyblade Pro’s use is scarce, particularly in comparison with dumbbell training.

Objective:

To compare muscle activity, using electromyography (EMG), in the back and shoulder regions during shoulder exercises with the Bodyblade Pro vs dumbbells.

Design:

Randomized crossover study.

Setting:

San Diego State University biomechanics laboratory.

Participants:

11 healthy male subjects age 19–32 y.

Intervention:

Subjects performed shoulder-flexion and -abduction exercises using a Bodyblade Pro and dumbbells (5, 8, and 10 lb) while EMG recorded activity of the deltoid, pectoralis major, infraspinatus, serratus anterior, and erector spinae.

Main Outcome Measures:

Average peak muscle activity (% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was separately measured for shoulder abduction and flexion in the range of 85° to 95°. Differences among exercise devices were separately analyzed for the flexed and abducted positions using 1-way repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results:

The Bodyblade Pro produced greater muscle activity than all the dumbbell trials. Differences were significant for all muscles measured (all P < .01) except for the erector spinae during shoulder flexion with a 10-lb dumbbell. EMG activity for the Bodyblade Pro exceeded 50% of the MVIC during both shoulder flexion and abduction. For the dumbbell conditions, only the 10-lb trials approached this effect.

Conclusions:

Using a Bodyblade during shoulder exercises results in greater shoulder- and back-muscle recruitment than dumbbells. The Bodyblade Pro can activate multiple muscles in a single exercise and thereby minimize the need for multiple dumbbell exercises. The Bodyblade Pro is an effective device for shoulder- and back-muscle activation that warrants further use by clinicians interested in its use for rehabilitation.

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Daniel H. Serravite, Arlette Perry, Kevin A. Jacobs, Jose A. Adams, Kysha Harriell and Joseph F. Signorile

Purpose:

To examine the effects of whole-body periodic acceleration (pGz) on exercise-induced-muscle-damage (EIMD) -related symptoms induced by unaccustomed eccentric arm exercise.

Methods:

Seventeen active young men (23.4 ± 4.6 y) made 6 visits to the research facility over a 2-wk period. On day 1, subjects performed a 1-repetition-maximum (1RM) elbowflexion test and were randomly assigned to the pGz (n = 8) or control group (n = 9). Criterion measurements were taken on day 2, before and immediately after performance of the eccentric-exercise protocol (10 sets, 10 repetitions using 120% 1RM) and after the recovery period. During subsequent sessions (24, 48, 72, and 96 h) these data were collected before pGz or passive recovery. Measurements included isometric strength (maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), blood markers (creatine kinase, myoglobin, IL-6, TNF-α, TBARS, PGF2α, protein carbonyls, uric acid, and nitrites), soreness, pain, circumference, and range of motion (ROM).

Results:

Significantly higher MVC values were seen for pGz throughout the recovery period. Within-group differences were seen in myoglobin, IL-6, IL-10, protein carbonyls, soreness, pain, circumference, and ROM showing small negative responses and rapid recovery for the pGz condition.

Conclusion:

Our results demonstrate that pGz can be an effective tool for the reduction of EIMD and may contribute to the training-adaptation cycle by speeding up the recovery of the body due to its performance-loss-lessening effect.

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Ashley Stern, Chris Kuenze, Daniel Herman, Lindsay D. Sauer and Joseph M. Hart

Context:

Central and peripheral muscle fatigue during exercise may exacerbate neuromuscular factors that increase risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury.

Objective:

To compare lower extremity motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), muscle strength, and electromyography (EMG) activation after an exercise protocol.

Design:

Pretest, posttest group comparison.

Setting:

University laboratory.

Participants:

34 healthy volunteers (17 female, age = 21.9 ± 2.3 years, weight = 77.8 ± 3.0 kg, height = 171.1 ± 6.6 cm, and 17 male, age = 23.4 ± 6.5 years, weight = 81.6 ± 3.3 kg, height = 179.6 ± 7.3 cm).

Intervention:

A standardized 30-min exercise protocol that involved 5 repeated cycles of uphill walking, body-weight squatting, and step-ups.

Main Outcome Measures:

Quadriceps and hamstring MEP amplitude (mV) and transmission velocity normalized to subject height (m/s) were elicited via transcranial magnetic stimulation and measured via surface EMG. Quadriceps and hamstring peak EMG activation (% MVIC) and peak torque (Nm/kg) were measured during MVICs. Separate ANCOVAs were used to compare groups after exercise while controlling for baseline measurement.

Results:

At baseline, males exhibited significantly greater knee-extension torques (males = 2.47 ± 0.68 Nm/kg, females = 1.95 ± 0.53 Nm/kg; P = .036) and significantly higher hamstring MEP amplitudes (males = 223.5 ± 134.0 mV, females = 89.3 ± 77.6 mV; P = .007). Males exhibited greater quadriceps MEP amplitude after exercise than females (males = 127.2 ± 112.7 mV, females = 32.3 ± 34.9 mV; P = .016).

Conclusions:

Males experienced greater peripheral neuromuscular changes manifested as more pronounced reductions in quadriceps torque after exercise. Females experienced greater central neuromuscular changes manifested as more pronounced reduction in quadriceps MEP amplitude. Reduced central neural drive of the quadriceps coupled with knee-extension torque preservation after exercise may increase risk of knee injury in females.

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Daniel P. Ferris, Joseph M. Czerniecki and Blake Hannaford

We developed a pneumatically powered orthosis for the human ankle joint. The orthosis consisted of a carbon fiber shell, hinge joint, and two artificial pneumatic muscles. One artificial pneumatic muscle provided plantar flexion torque and the second one provided dorsiflexion torque. Computer software adjusted air pressure in each artificial muscle independently so that artificial muscle force was proportional to rectified low-pass-filtered electromyography (EMG) amplitude (i.e., proportional myoelectric control). Tibialis anterior EMG activated the artificial dorsiflexor and soleus EMG activated the artificial plantar flexor. We collected joint kinematic and artificial muscle force data as one healthy participant walked on a treadmill with the orthosis. Peak plantar flexor torque provided by the orthosis was 70 Nm, and peak dorsiflexor torque provided by the orthosis was 38 Nm. The orthosis could be useful for basic science studies on human locomotion or possibly for gait rehabilitation after neurological injury.

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Daniel H. Huffman, Brian G. Pietrosimone, Terry L. Grindstaff, Joseph M. Hart, Susan A. Saliba and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Context:

Motoneuron-pool facilitation after cryotherapy may be mediated by stimulation of thermoreceptors surrounding a joint. It is unknown whether menthol counterirritants, which also stimulate thermoreceptors, have the same effect on motoneuron-pool excitability (MNPE).

Objective:

To compare quadriceps MNPE after a menthol-counterirritant application to the anterior knee, a sham counterirritant application, and a control treatment in healthy subjects.

Design:

A blinded, randomized controlled laboratory study.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Participants:

Thirty healthy subjects (16 m, 14 f; 24.1 ± 3.9 y, 170.6 ± 11.4 cm, 72.1 ± 15.6 kg) with no history of lower extremity surgery volunteered for this study.

Intervention:

Two milliliters of menthol or sham counterirritant was applied to the anterior knee; control subjects received no intervention.

Main Outcome Measures:

The average vastus medialis normalized Hoffmann reflex (Hmax:Mmax ratio) was used to measure MNPE. Measurements were recorded at 5, 15, 25, and 35 minutes postintervention and compared with baseline measures.

Results:

Hmax:Mmax ratios for all groups significantly decreased over time (F4,108 = 10.52, P < .001; menthol: baseline = .32 ± .20, 5 min = .29 ± .18, 15 min = .27 ± .18, 25 min = .28 ± .19, 35 min = .27 ± .18; sham: baseline = .46 ± .26, 5 min = .36 ± .20, 15 min = .35 ± .19, 25 min = .35 ± .20, 35 min = .34 ± .18; control: baseline = .48 ± .32, 5 min = .37 ± .27, 15 min = .37 ± .27, 25 min = .37 ± .29, 35 min = .35 ± .28). No significant Group × Time interaction or group differences in Hmax:Mmax were found.

Conclusions:

Menthol did not affect quadriceps MNPE in healthy subjects.

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Stephen D. Anton, Michael G. Perri, Joseph Riley III, William F. Kanasky Jr., James R. Rodrigue, Samuel F. Sears and A. Daniel Martin

This study examined whether specific participant characteristics (age, sex, BMI, exercise history, and self-efficacy) differentially predicted adherence to exercise programs of moderate vs. higher levels of intensity and frequency. Sedentary adults (N = 379) were randomly assigned in a 2 × 2 design to walk 30 min/day at a frequency of either 3 to 4 days/week or 5 to 7 days/week, at an intensity of either 45–55% or 65–75% of maximum heart rate reserve. Exercise adherence was assessed via daily exercise logs completed during Months 2–6 of the exercise program. The major finding of this study was that participants with higher levels of past exercise showed better adherence to higher intensity exercise but tended to have poorer adherence to moderate intensity exercise. Our results suggest that a person’s previous experience with exercise should be considered when prescribing higher intensity exercise, and that individuals with an extensive exercise history can be prescribed higher intensity exercise.