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Daniel P. Bailey, Louise A. Savory, Sarah J. Denton and Catherine J. Kerr

Background:

It is unclear whether cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is independently linked to cardiometabolic risk in children. This study investigated a) the association between CRF level and presence of cardiometabolic risk disorders using health-related cut points, and b) whether these associations were mediated by abdominal adiposity in children.

Methods:

This was a cross-sectional design study. Anthropometry, biochemical parameters and CRF were assessed in 147 schoolchildren (75 girls) aged 10 to 14 years. CRF was determined using a maximal cycle ergometer test. Children were classified as ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ according to published thresholds. Logistic regression was used to investigate the odds of having individual and clustered cardiometabolic risk factors according to CRF level and whether abdominal adiposity mediated these associations.

Results:

Children classified as unfit had increased odds of presenting individual and clustered cardiometabolic risk factors (P < .05), but these associations no longer remained after adjusting for abdominal adiposity (P > .05).

Conclusions:

This study suggests that the association between CRF and cardiometabolic risk is mediated by abdominal adiposity in 10- to 14-year-old children and that abdominal adiposity may be a more important determinant of adverse cardiometabolic health in this age group.

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Stephanie L. Stockwell, Lindsey R. Smith, Hannah M. Weaver, Daniella J. Hankins and Daniel P. Bailey

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between sedentary behavior patterns and cardiometabolic risk in children using a monitor that accurately distinguishes between different postures. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 118 children (67 girls) aged 11–12 years had adiposity, blood pressure, lipids, and glucose measured, and then they wore an activPAL device to record sitting, standing, and stepping for 7 consecutive days. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. Results: After adjustment for potential confounders and moderate to vigorous physical activity, the number of breaks in sitting was significantly negatively associated with adiposity (standardized β ≥ −0.546; P ≤ .001) and significantly positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = 0.415; P ≤ .01). Time in prolonged sitting bouts was significantly negatively associated with adiposity (β ≥ −0.577; P ≤ .001) and significantly positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = 0.432; P ≤ .05). Standing time was significantly negatively associated with adiposity (β ≥ −0.270; P ≤ .05) and significantly positively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = 0.312; P ≤ .05). Conclusions: This study suggests that increasing the number of breaks in sitting and increasing standing time are beneficially associated with cardiometabolic risk and should be considered in health promotion interventions in children.