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Robert Weinberg and Daniel Weigand

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Robert S. Weinberg and Daniel A. Weigand

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Damon Burton, David Yukelson, Robert Weinberg and Daniel Weigand

The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify how frequently and effectively collegiate athletes set goals and goal strategies and assess differences in goal practices across effectiveness groups. Participants were 321 male and 249 female college athletes participating in 18 sports at four universities, who completed the Collegiate Goal Setting in Sport Questionnaire. Descriptive results indicated that most athletes set goals but rated them as only moderately effective. MANOVA findings revealed that highly effective goal setters used all types of goals and implementation strategies more frequently and effectively than their less-effective counterparts. Discriminant analysis results revealed that the frequency of product-related goals and goal implementation strategy usage and the effectiveness of process-related goals best discriminated between effectiveness groups. Discussion focuses on the need to educate practitioners about the value of goals and how to use them most effectively.

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Robert Weinberg, Dave Yukelson, Damon Burton and Daniel Weigand

The purpose of this investigation was to explore Olympic athletes’ perceptions concerning the frequency and effectiveness of goal setting strategies as well as goal preferences and barriers to achieving these goals. Participants were 185 male and 143 female Olympic athletes from a variety sports. Each athlete completed a questionnaire detailing their perceptions, use, and effectiveness of a number of different goal-setting strategies. Factor analysis revealed four similar factors for goal effectiveness and goal frequency and two distinct factors for goal barriers. Descriptive results revealed that all of the Olympic athletes practiced some type of goal setting to help enhance performance, and they found their goals to be highly effective. Athletes also reported that improving overall performance, winning, and having fun were the three most important goals. In addition, setting difficult goals that were somewhat above the level at which they perform was the most preferred level of goal difficulty. Future directions for research are offered including exploration of developmental differences and variations in coach versus athlete perceptions.

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Bert Hayslip Jr., Daniel Weigand, Robert Weinberg, Peggy Richardson and Allen Jackson

The present investigation reports on the reliability and validity of several scales derived from the Health Belief Model (HBM). Both their internal consistency and their ability to predict self-reported sport and physical activity participation among younger and older adults are examined. As an exploratory endeavor, new, internally consistent scales were developed to assess several HBM factors. Results of age-group comparisons as well as comparisons across levels of diversity in several types of self-reported physical activity suggest that the newly developed measures differentiate between individuals on the basis of age and degrees of diversity in activity.

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Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Brian Hemmings, Daniel Weigand, Caryl Becker and Lynn Booth

Objective:

To assess, on a national level, the views of chartered physiotherapists with regard to the psychological content of physiotherapy practice.

Design:

A postal survey to a national list of sport injury and physiotherapy clinics was employed.

Participants:

A total of 361 responses were included in the descriptive statistical and qualitative analyses.

Measurements:

The Physiotherapist and Sport Psychology Questionnaire (PSPQ).

Results:

On average, physiotherapists felt that athletes were psychologically affected 83% of the time when injured. Key psychological characteristics were also identified in athletes who cope/do not cope successfully with their injuries. Physiotherapists reported using psychological techniques in their work and expressed the need for further training in the field. Only 24.1% of the physiotherapists stated having accesses to accredited sport psychologists.

Conclusions:

Results suggest that UK physiotherapists possess practical experiences and good awareness for psychological aspects of injuries and acknowledge the importance of treating a range of psychological conditions.

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Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Kim Gammage, Anne Haase, Cathy Lirgg, Athanasios Papaioannou and Daniel Weigand

Edited by J. Robert Grove

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Daniel Weigand, Cathy Lirgg, Kim Gammage, Anne Haase and Athanasios Papaioannou

Edited by J. Robert Grove

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Kathleen A. Martin, Jean Côté, Oliver Stoll, Cathy Lirgg and Daniel A. Weigand

Edited by J. Robert Grove

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J. Robert Grove, Anne Haase, Kathleen A. Martin, Cathy Lirgg and Daniel A. Weigand