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  • Author: Daniela Terson de Paleville x
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Jason C. Immekus, Franklin Muntis and Daniela Terson de Paleville

The associations between motor proficiency, postural control, and visual efficiency with teacher and parent ratings of children’s behavior and academic skills were examined among a sample of elementary school-aged children (N = 50). Teacher and parent ratings of students’ academic skills were analyzed separately to examine the predictive nature of measures of motor proficiency. Spearman rank order correlations reported low to moderate relationships between motor proficiency, postural control, and children’s behavior (e.g., ADHD inattention) and academic skills. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (lasso) procedure is demonstrated as an approach for variable selection of measures of children’s motor proficiency, postural control, and visual efficiency to predict academic skills. For teacher and parent ratings of academic skills, ADHD symptom of inattention was the strongest model predictor, whereas directional control (postural control) was also a predictor for parent ratings. Study findings shed light on practical and methodological factors associated with motor skills in educational contexts.