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  • Author: Daryll B. Bullen x
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Daryll B. Bullen, Mary L. O'Toole and Karen C. Johnson

The purpose of this study was to compare daily calcium (Ca) losses in sweat (S) and urine (U) on an exercise day (E) with losses on the preceding day (i.e., a rest day) during which no exercise (NE) was performed. Ten healthy male volunteers (23.9 ± 3.2 years) performed a single bout of moderate exercise (running at 80% HRmax) for 45 min in a warm (32 °C, 58% relative humidity) environment on E. When E and NE were compared, neither Ca intake (1,232 ± 714 and 1,148 ±482 mg, respectively) nor urinary Ca excretion (206 ± 128 and 189 ± 130 mg, respectively) were different (p > .05). Sweat Ca losses during the exercise bout averaged 45 ± 12 mg. The results indicate that, although a small amount of Ca is lost in sweat during 45 min of moderate-intensity exercise, measured (sweat and urine losses combined) Ca losses (251 ±128 and 189 ± 130 mg) were not different (p > .05) between days (E and NE, respectively). These data suggest that moderate exercise for up to 45 min in a warm, humid environment does not markedly increase Ca intake requirements.

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Richard B. Kreider, Robert Klesges, Karen Harmon, Pamela Grindstaff, Leigh Ramsey, Daryll Bullen, Larry Wood, Yuhua Li and Anthony Almada

This study examined the effects of ingesting nutritional supplements designed to promote lean tissue accretion on body composition alterations during resistance training. Twenty-eight resistance-trained males blindly supplemented their diets with maltodextrin (M), Gainers Fuel® 1000 (GF), or Phosphagain™ (P). No significant differences were observed in absolute or relative total body water among groups. Energy intake and body weight significantly increased in all groups combined throughout the study with no group or interaction differences observed. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry-determined body mass significantly increased in each group throughout the study with significantly greater gains observed in the GF and P groups. Lean tissue mass (excluding bone) gain was significantly greater in the P group, while fat mass and percent body fat were significantly increased in the GF group. Results indicate that total body weight significantly increased in each group and that P supplementation resulted in significantly greater gains in lean tissue mass during resistance training.