Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author: David C. Griffey x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

David C. Griffey

Restricted access

David C. Griffey

Restricted access

David C. Griffey

Restricted access

David C. Griffey and Richard S. Podemski

Restricted access

Edited by Thomas J. Templin and David C. Griffey

Restricted access

Teresa E. Boggess, Ronald E. McBride and David C. Griffey

This study was conducted to assess the level of concern that exists in physical education student teachers with regard to self, task, and impact—three areas of concern identified by Frances Fuller and her colleagues during the 1960s and 1970s. The study follows the changes in the level of concern during the student teaching semester. Information gathered was subjected to factor analysis where it was found that Fuller’s three constructs did not exist among the physical education student teachers sampled. Rather, a more elaborate pattern of concern development was uncovered than that reported in previous work. The authors make recommendations for the supervisors of student teachers as a result of these findings.

Restricted access

Theresa E. Boggess, David C. Griffey and Lynn D. Housner

Eleven elementary physical education teachers provided information about their perceptions of 251 students’ temperament characteristics and estimates of four student aptitudes: motor ability, social interaction skills, motivation, and to what level of their potential students generally worked. Estimates of the frequency that teachers would attend to each child in typical instructional situations were also gathered. Factor analysis of the temperament measures revealed three independent factors: physical sensitivity, adaptability, and reactivity/task orientation. Teachers’ decisions to attend to children were regressed on temperament factors and student aptitude measures. The findings indicated that motor ability was the most important variable teachers reported they would use in making decisions about allocating their attention during instruction. The temperament factor reactivity/task orientation was the next most important factor. The analyses suggested that teachers would consider adaptability of students only in organizational patterns that include the whole group.

Restricted access

Ronald E. McBride, Theresa E. Boggess and David C. Griffey

The purpose of this study was to identify and assess the kinds of concerns expressed by experienced physical education teachers and to compare them to Fuller’s postulated developmental theory of teaching concerns. The study also sought to assess the applicability of the Teacher Concerns Questionnaire (TCQ) instrument in a physical education environment. Data were subjected to factor analysis, where it was found that, overall, the experienced teachers did follow Fuller’s three stages of development. Two distinct constellations were identified, as was a third, weaker constellation. This third factor corresponded to Fuller’s task scale and additional study is recommended to identify items more appropriate to an inservice physical education environment. The authors make recommendations for follow-up experiences in an inservice setting.