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David D. Pascoe and Timothy E. Moore

The decline in federal research grant funding and incentive-based budget models to support a university’s mission has necessitated a paradigm shift in the pursuit of available sources of funding. Programs built around federal funding are once again pursuing funding opportunities from industry. Universities are reevaluating their research funding models and career expectations (tenure, promotion) that support a researcher, laboratories, and a defined research agenda. Kinesiology departments are in a strong position to pursue industry funding for fitness, sports, and performance-related research. While grant funding focuses on empirical data-driven research, industry looks for product exposure, validation (empirical data to support claims), and commercialization. Industry partnerships can provide funding in supporting research, developing sponsor-named facilities that benefit both parties. With these cooperative efforts come some unique challenges (financial, proprietary, data interpretation, etc.) that must be addressed.

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Mynor Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jeffrey S. Martin, David D. Pascoe, Michael D. Roberts and Danielle W. Wadsworth

Background: We sought to determine the effect of multiple walking breaks from sedentary behavior (SED) on glucose responses in sedentary obese women. Materials and Methods: Ten women [aged = 36 (5) y, body mass index = 38.0 (1.6) kg/m2, body fat = 49.6 (1.4)%] completed 3 conditions (48-h “washout” in-between conditions) following a standardized meal in random order: 4-hour SED, 4-hour SED with 2 minutes of moderate-intensity walking every 30 minutes (SED + 2 min), and 4-hour SED with 5 minutes of moderate-intensity walking every 30 minutes (SED + 5 min). Measurements included continuous interstitial glucose concentration monitoring immediately before and during standardized conditions and accelerometry for physical activity patterns during and in-between the standardized conditions. Repeated-measures 1-way analyses of variance (α = .05) with Bonferroni correction for post hoc comparisons were performed. Effect sizes (d [95% confidence interval]) were calculated as mean difference from SED/pooled standard deviation. Results: Sedentary time was similar in the 48 hours preceding each condition (P > .05). By design, sedentary time was different between conditions (P < .001). Compared with SED, 2-hour postprandial glucose positive incremental area under the curve was lower for SED + 5 minutes (P = .005; d = − 0.57 [−1.48, 0.40]), but not for SED + 2 minutes (P = .086; d = − 0.71 [−1.63, 0.27]). Four-hour postprandial glucose area under the curve was similar between conditions (P > .05). Conclusion: In sedentary obese women, 5 minutes of moderate-intensity walking breaks from SED each 30 minutes attenuate 2-hour postprandial glucose excursions.

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Danielle D. Wadsworth, Mary E. Rudisill, Jared A. Russell, James R. McDonald and David D. Pascoe

The School of Kinesiology at Auburn University unites teaching, research, and outreach efforts to provide access to physical activity for local, statewide, and global communities. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs as well as strategies to mobilize efforts for physical activity outreach within an academic setting. School-wide efforts include youth initiatives, physical activity assessments offered through our TigerFit program, and the United States Olympic Team Handball training center. All programs provide service-learning opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students as well as outreach outcomes. Furthermore, the programs provide a platform for scholarship in the form of publications, partnerships for grant submissions, and student research projects. Merging teaching, outreach, and scholarship has provided longevity for the programs, thereby establishing long-term social ties to the community and providing continued access to physical activity to promote public health.

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Jeffrey J. Zachwieja, David L. Costill, Glenn C. Beard, Robert A. Robergs, David D. Pascoe and Dawn E. Anderson

To determine the effect of a carbonated carbohydrate (CHO) drink on gastric function and exercise performance, eight male cyclists completed four 120- min bouts of cycling. Each bout consisted of a 105-min ride at 70% VO2max followed by a 15-min self-paced performance ride. During each trial, one of four test solutions was ingested: carbonated CHO (C-10%), noncarbonated CHO (NC-10%), carbonated non-CHO (C), and noncarbonated non-CHO (NC). Following the performance ride, the subjects had their stomach contents removed by aspiration. There were no significant differences in gastric emptying (GE) except for Trial C-10%, which averaged 13.3% less than NC. However, there was no difference in the perception of gastrointestinal comfort between this trial and any other. Average power output during the performance ride was not significantly different between carbonated and noncarbonated trials, or between CHO-fed and no-CHO trials; however, the subjects worked at a greater intensity when fed CHO. Finally, acid base status did not change when a carbonated drink was ingested. This indicates that adding carbonation to a sport drink does not significantly alter gastric function, the perception of GI comfort, or exercise performance.