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David J. Langley

The purpose of this study was to describe and interpret student perspectives and thoughts associated with the teaching/learning process. Twenty university students enrolled in a 10-week Bowling I course and their instructor served as participants. Four qualitative sources of data were collected involving student perspectives and thoughts. A core category derived from the qualitative analysis indicated that student perspectives and thoughts centered on errors in task performance. A systematic approach outlined the properties, causes, intervening conditions, strategies, and consequences of strategies associated with this core category. The results are interpreted within a theory of situated cognition, emphasizing student perspectives as embedded within multiple contexts found in the social setting.

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David J. Langley

A large volume of research has focused on the benefits of appropriate health-related fitness activities for older adults (Spirduso, 1994). Although lifetime participation in sports is a common alternative to fitness activities, few studies have examined the subjective, personal experience underlying initial sport-skill development. The purpose of this study was to illustrate how dynamical-systems theory is a useful lens through which to examine the evolution of golf skill in 1 senior adult participant. Qualitative data collected over 7 months focused on a personal diary, formal and informal interviews, videotape analyses, and observational field notes. The development of golf skill was bounded by a series of functional constraints, as well as limiting factors connected to the task and the environment. The results illustrate the theoretical proposition (NewelI. 1986) that skill learning arises from and is structured by a system of interacting constraints.

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Karen Pagnano and David J. Langley

This study explored the perspectives of two experienced female high school teachers regarding their use of exercise as a management tool. The participants were specifically chosen to embody one of two positions: exercise was an appropriate and frequent strategy for managing student misbehavior, or an inappropriate and unused strategy. A qualitative approach was adopted, and multiple forms of data were obtained and analyzed thematically. Two concepts on the nature of the sport participation experience were adapted to frame teacher perspectives on the use of exercise to manage student misbehavior. It is suggested that both participants integrated their prior sport experiences into an evolving life structure and subsequently constructed a management style that was consistent with that structure. Prior experiences involving power and performance sports helped to rationalize the use of exercise to manage student misbehavior. In contrast, prior experiences associated with pleasure and participation sports influenced the belief that exercise was an inappropriate strategy for managing student misbehavior.

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David J. Langley and Sharon M. Knight

The broad purpose of this paper is to contextualize the meaning and evolution of competitive sport participation among the aged by describing the life story of a senior aged participant. We used narrative inquiry to examine the integration of sport into the life course and continuity theory to examine the evolution of his life story. Continuity theory proposes that individuals are predisposed to preserve and maintain longstanding patterns of thought and behavior throughout their adult development. Based on this theory, we suggest that continuity in successful competitive sport involvement for this participant may represent a primary adaptive strategy for coping with the aging process. Successful involvement in sport appeared to mediate past and continuing patterns of social relationships, the development of personal identity, and a general propensity for lifelong physical activity.