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David J. Pezzullo

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot injuries athletes sustain. The painful heel is the result of overloading and inflammation of the plantar fascia at its insertion into the medial process of the tuberosity of the calcaneus. Many different treatment approaches have been used to address this overuse problem. Treatment for plantar fasciitis has included decreased weight bearing, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), orthotics, arch taping, weight loss, steroid injections, ultrasound, ice, physical therapy, and surgical release. Clinically the use of night splints has been found to be very successful in the treatment of plantar fasciitis, as described in this case study.

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David J. Pezzullo

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David J. Pezzullo, James J. Irrgang and Susan L. Whitney

Patellar tendonitis is a common pathology seen in athletes involved in activities requiring forceful eccentric muscle contractions or repeated flexion and extension of the knee. This article reviews the related anatomy, biomechanics, mechanism of injury, and diagnosis of patellar tendonitis. It also presents several treatment approaches and suggestions to help identify athletes at risk.

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Susan L. Whitney, Larry Mattocks, James J. Irrgang, Pamela A. Gentile, David Pezzullo and Abdulazeem Kamkar

The purpose of this two-part study was to determine if lower extremity girth measurements are repeatable. Sixteen males and 14 females participated in the intra- and intertester reliability portion of this study. Girth was assessed at five different lower extremity sites by two physical therapists using a standard tape measure. Thirty measures (15 by each examiner) were collected on the subject's right leg, and a mean of the three measures was used in the analysis. The measurements were repeated 7 days later. It was found that by using a simple standardized procedure, girth measurements in the clinic can be highly repeatable in experienced clinicians. Part 2 of the study involved testing the right and left legs of 22 subjects to determine if girth of the right and left legs was similar. All subjects had their girth assessed at five sites on their right and left legs during one session. It was found that girth measures on the right and left lower extremities are comparable. In an acutely injured lower extremity, it might be assumed that the girth of both lower extremities is similar.