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Jeffrey Petersen and David Pierce

Undergraduate sport management curriculum continues to be debated amongst this discipline’s educators. Curricular content impacts professional sport organizations as program graduates become employees. This study gathered the input of human resource professionals from NFL, MLB, and NBA franchises regarding curricular topics via an existing, modified questionnaire. The questionnaire included a five-point scale assessment of 61 curricular topics. A 34.8% response rate was proportionally distributed between the leagues. An ANOVA of means for ten curricular areas revealed significant differences with the following rank order: Field Experience 4.38; Communication 4.23; Legal Aspects 4.02; Ethics 3.98; Management and Leadership 3.97; Marketing 3.96; Economics 3.68; Budget and Finance 3.59; Governance 3.25; and Socio-Cultural Aspects 3.25. An ANOVA of topics revealed seven significant between-league differences including: Sport Sociology, Ethics, Market Shares/Ratings, Business Writing, Labor Relations, Stadium/Arena Economics, and Risk Management/Liability. These results can inform the development or modification of curricula to better prepare students for professional sport needs.

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David Pierce and James Johnson

Holland’s vocational choice theory is used in vocational counseling to aid job seekers in finding occupations that fit their personality based on Holland’s RIASEC typology of personalities and work environments. The purpose of this research was to determine the Holland RIASEC profiles for occupations within the sport industry by having employees in intercollegiate athletics complete the Position Classification Inventory. Results indicated that the three-letter Holland code for the sport industry is SEC. The sport industry is dominated by the Social environment, evidenced by seven occupations possessing Social in the first letter of the profile and Social rating in the top two letters for all occupations. Seven occupations were primarily Social, three were Realistic, two were Enterprising, and two were Conventional. A multivariate analysis of variance was also conducted to compare differences between occupational disciplines on the six Holland environments. Implications for sport industry occupations and the application of Holland’s theory are discussed.

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Coyte G. Cooper and David Pierce

With the growing popularity of the Internet as a communication medium, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletic departments have turned to their Web sites to build interest in their product among consumers. As sites continue to develop traffic, it is important to examine the coverage being provided on the home Web pages to determine whether equitable coverage is being allocated to men’s and women’s nonrevenue sport teams. The current research featured a content analysis of NCAA divisional Web-site coverage during an academic school year. From a broad perspective, the results indicated that only Division III provided equitable gender and individual team coverage allocations on its home Web pages. In contrast, the data also supported the notion that Division I athletic programs (Football Bowl Subdivision [FBS] and Football Championship Subdivision [FCS]) provided significantly more coverage to men’s baseball, men’s basketball, and men’s football than nonrevenue-sport teams. The FBS and FCS coverage inequalities are discussed in depth in the article.

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David A. Pierce and Jeffrey C. Petersen

Experiential learning within sport sales is a growing component of the sport management curriculum. Assessment of student learning outcomes within these experiences is important in quantifying the effectiveness of the learning experience. This study utilized a survey to examine the change in students’ perceptions of sport sales as a result of completing an experiential, client-based sport sales program. The methodology included development and analysis of a survey instrument and application of that survey with enrolled and non-enrolled groups with pre- and post-test experiential learning assessment. Student expectations of a career in sport sales significantly decreased after program completion (t(56) = 2.33, p < .05), while their perception of skill level and preparation for a sport sales employment did not significantly change for the experimental group. These findings relate this learning experience to a realistic job preview for the students, which typically decrease an individual’s expectations toward a particular job (Premack & Wanous, 1985).

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David A. Pierce and Jeffrey C. Petersen

This educational review provides an overview of the application of experiential learning in the area of sport sales. Insights are provided for sport management academicians that relate to planning and initiating experiential client-based sales projects, and the analysis of the benefits and drawbacks associated with four approaches to lead generation (promotional lead approach, sales table approach, upselling approach, and retention approach), delivery of sales training methods (professor driven, team driven, and practice), and operation of a call center within three distinct frameworks (remote, on-site, or independent). Guidance for project assessment, both during the project and after project completion, is discussed, and the article concludes with a strong connection of the inherent value of such training with the added value of client-based sport sales training to the sport industry.

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Noni Zaharia, Anastasios Kaburakis and David Pierce

The growth of sport management programs housed in (or with formal curriculum-based ties to) a school of business indicates more academic institutions are reconsidering sport management as a business-oriented field. Thus, research is necessary regarding benchmarking information on the state of these academic programs. The purpose of this study is to explore trends on administration, housing, accreditation, faculty performance indicators and research requirements, as well as salaries for faculty and alumni of such programs. Data were submitted by 74 department chairs and program directors employed in U.S. business schools featuring sport management programs. Results indicate that the majority of sport business programs are part of an interdisciplinary department; COSMA accreditation is largely viewed as redundant; and, depending on business schools’ accreditation, variability exists concerning faculty performance measures and research impact, as well as faculty and alumni salaries. These findings suggest considerable progress of sport management programs within business schools.

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Christopher Hautbois, Michel Desbordes and David Pierce

Sport is a relevant vehicle for worldwide companies to promote products and services (Amis, Slack, & Berrett, 1999). This approach corresponds to a major theoretical field related to sport sponsorship (Stotlar, 2004b). Nonprofit organizations are also concerned with this kind of communication strategy. These organizations expect a return on investment in terms of image, awareness, or territorial economic impact. This article contributes to the public sport-marketing and -sponsorship model. The 10-year study of the French Seine-Saint-Denis department case underscores the fundamentals of this model. This study is a qualitative research study with data analyzed through the use of ATLAS.ti 6.

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David Pierce, Melissa Davies and Bryan Kryder

This article outlines an opportunity for sport management instructors to integrate design thinking as a pedagogical tool into their classrooms to align with the demands of today’s innovative and evolving sport industry. Design thinking enables students to become designers and to approach problems from an empathetic and creative perspective to promote innovative solutions to a wide range of problems. This article will introduce design-thinking concepts and how they align with the advancing sport management curriculum before outlining the steps required for instructors to incorporate design thinking into a sport management capstone class.

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Anastasios Kaburakis, Linda A. Sharp and David A. Pierce

Case law discussions in sport management scholarship and pedagogy frequently focus exclusively on one primary topic area. Thus, a case serves as a textbook example of a specific legal theory and management practice points. Occasionally, a multi-faceted case allows for an elaborate, comprehensive analysis, integrating teaching concepts from several areas of the law. Such is the factual scenario of O’Brien v. Ohio State University. This teaching case study offers lessons in Contract Law, NCAA Compliance, and International Arbitration. The complex web of these three intersections of sport law, policy, and management provides students and scholars the opportunity to both delve deeper into concepts and learn crucial details in a broader context. Key facets of each portion instrumentally affected the other portions of the case, triggering chain reactions. Teaching this case contributes to students’ appreciation of these intertwining concepts, and creates overall awareness of potentially far-reaching ramifications for each action.