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Binh Nguyen, Adrian Bauman and Ding Ding

Purpose:

To examine the combined effects of body mass index (BMI), physical activity (PA) and sitting on incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among Australian adults.

Methods:

A sample of 29,572 adults aged ≥45 years from New South Wales, Australia, completed baseline (2006–2008) and follow-up (2010) questionnaires. Incident T2DM was defined as self-reported, physician-diagnosed diabetes at follow-up. BMI was categorized as normal/overweight/obese. PA was tertiled into low/medium/ high. Sitting was dichotomized as higher/lower sitting (≥ 8 hours/day or < 8 hours/day). Odds ratios (OR) were estimated for developing T2DM using logistics regression for individual and combined risk factors, and data stratified by BMI categories.

Results:

During a mean 2.7 (SD: 0.9) years of follow-up, 611 (2.1%) participants developed T2DM. In fully adjusted models, BMI was the only independent risk factor for incident T2DM. In stratified analyses, the association between BMI and T2DM did not differ significantly across sitting or PA categories. Overweight/obese individuals with high PA and lower sitting had higher odds of incident T2DM than normal counterparts with low PA and higher sitting.

Conclusions:

High PA/low sitting did not attenuate the risk of T2DM associated with overweight/obesity. Maintaining a healthy weight, by adopting healthy lifestyle behaviors, is critical for T2DM prevention.

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Josef Mitáš, Ding Ding, Karel Frömel and Jacqueline Kerr

Background:

Post-communist countries have experienced rapid economic development and social changes, which have been accompanied by changes in health-related lifestyle behaviors, such as physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of domain-specific physical activity and total sedentary time with BMI among adults in the Czech Republic.

Methods:

We surveyed a nationally representative sample (n = 4097) of the Czech Republic in fall 2007 using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (long form). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine associations of physical activity, sedentary time and sociodemograhic characteristics with BMI.

Results:

Older age, lower educational attainment, and lower levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with higher BMI. Compared with those living in large cities, men living in small towns and women living in small villages had higher BMI.

Conclusions:

This study has identified correlates of BMI in the Czech Republic. Although more evidence from longitudinal studies is needed, findings from the current study can inform interventions to prevent the rising obesity epidemic.

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Ding Ding, Klaus Gebel, Becky Freeman and Adrian E. Bauman

Media reporting of published research findings can increase the profile and reach of new scientific findings. Dissemination is an important part of research, and media reporting can catalyze this process. In many areas, including health-related research, policymakers often rely on the media for information and guidance. Furthermore, media reports can influence the scientific community and clinicians.1·2 However, despite the potential beneficial role as a bridge between scientists and the public, misleading information can cause controversy, confusion, and even harm.3

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Haiyong Ding, Haichun Sun and Ang Chen

To be successful in learning, students need to be motivated to engage and learn. The domain-specificity motivation theory articulates that student motivation is often determined by the content being taught to them. The purpose of this study was to extend the theory by determining domain-specificity of situational interest and expectancy-value motivation in terms of engagement and achievement outcomes in physical education. A random student sample (N = 346) from eight Chinese middle schools provided data of situational interest, expectancy-value, engagement, and knowledge and skills acquired. Results from correlation, regression, and structural equation model analyses revealed causal inferences demonstrating differentiated effects of motivation components on the outcome measures: task values were specific to knowledge outcome, expectancy beliefs to skills, and situational interest to engagement. The findings imply that physical educators need to adopt motivation strategies compatible to specific learning outcomes to maximize student motivation for engagement and achievement.

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Lewis Keane, Emma Sherry, Nico Schulenkorf, Joel Negin, Ding Ding, Adrian Bauman, Edward Jegasothy and Justin Richards

Background: The purpose of this paper was to identify personal, social, and environmental mediators of recreational physical activity (PA) in a 6-month netball-based intervention for women and girls in Tonga. Methods: Tonga Netball’s “low-engagement village program” was implemented in 10 villages and aimed to increase the recreational PA levels in women and girls through a comprehensive, structured community-level netball program addressing key barriers to participation. In a mixed-methods approach, these mediating barriers were identified through qualitative interviews based on the socioecological model. Quantitative measures for mediators and recreational PA were then developed, and data from 301 women and girls were collected. Standard mediation analyses methods were then applied. Results: Program participation appeared to significantly increase PA levels. Statistically significant personal mediators were body issues, preferring competitions, and clothing. Social mediators were support from sports council, community leaders, friends, and church. Environmental mediators were travel time and access to balls, bibs, and umpires. Conclusion: A comprehensive community-level program addressing key participation barriers can increase recreational PA among women and girls in Tonga. Triangulating these results with mediation analyses of variables on the causal pathway can strengthen our understanding of causation and inform funding prioritization for critical program components in similar contexts.

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Louise L. Hardy, Ding Ding, Louisa R. Peralta, Seema Mihrshahi and Dafna Merom

Background: To examine the associations between school-age children’s sedentary behavior, screen time, and 3 physical activity attributes: muscular strength, cardiorespiratory endurance (CRE), and fundamental movement skills. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 2734 children in years 2 and 4 and 3671 adolescents in years 6, 8, and 10. Total sitting time, 6 screen time behaviors, and physical activity were measured by self-report. Muscular strength was assessed by standing broad jump; CRE by 20-m shuttle run test; and fundamental movement skills by process-oriented checklists. Associations between incremental sitting and screen time (in hours) and meeting the healthy zone of physical activity attributes were examined using logistic regression. Results: After adjusting for covariates and physical activity, children had lower odds of achieving the healthy zone for muscular strength and CRE for each hour of week (but not weekend) screen time. For adolescents, each hour of screen time per day was associated with lower odds of achieving the healthy fitness zone for CRE, locomotor skills, and overall healthy zone, and each hour of weekend screen time was associated with lower odds of achieving the healthy zone for most attributes and overall healthy zone. The associations were slightly stronger among adolescent girls than boys. The findings were similar for total sitting time. Conclusions: Screen time was associated with a lower likelihood to achieve healthy zones of physical activity attributes, and the effect was more consistent and slightly stronger among adolescents than children. This may suggest that the negative effects of screen time are incremental, emerging during adolescence.

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Piaolin Peng, Shaolan Ding, Zhikang Wang, Yifan Zhang and Jiahao Pan

The purpose of this study was to explore the immediate effects of running speed and midsole type on foot loading during heel–toe running. Fifteen healthy male college students were required to complete 3 running trials on an indoor 45-m tartan runway at 4 different speeds (3, 4, 5, and 6 m/s) using 2 different running footwear types (engineering thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, polyurethane elastomer; and ethylene vinyl acetate, vinyl acetate). The ground reaction force and plantar pressure data were quantified. Significant speed effects were detected both in ground reaction force and plantar pressure-related data (P < .05). Vertical average loading rate was significantly less, and time to first peak occurred later for the polyurethane elastomer compared with vinyl acetate footwear (P < .05). The peak pressure of the heel, medial forefoot, central forefoot, lateral forefoot, and big toe was significantly less when subjects wore a polyurethane elastomer than vinyl acetate footwear (P < .05). Overall, our results suggested that, compared with the vinyl acetate footwear, the special polyurethane elastomer footwear that is adhered with thousands of polyurethane elastomer granules was effective at reducing the mechanical impact on the foot.

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Brigid M. Lynch, Suzanne C. Dixon-Suen, Andrea Ramirez Varela, Yi Yang, Dallas R. English, Ding Ding, Paul A. Gardiner and Terry Boyle

Background: It is not always clear whether physical activity is causally related to health outcomes, or whether the associations are induced through confounding or other biases. Randomized controlled trials of physical activity are not feasible when outcomes of interest are rare or develop over many years. Thus, we need methods to improve causal inference in observational physical activity studies. Methods: We outline a range of approaches that can improve causal inference in observational physical activity research, and also discuss the impact of measurement error on results and methods to minimize this. Results: Key concepts and methods described include directed acyclic graphs, quantitative bias analysis, Mendelian randomization, and potential outcomes approaches which include propensity scores, g methods, and causal mediation. Conclusions: We provide a brief overview of some contemporary epidemiological methods that are beginning to be used in physical activity research. Adoption of these methods will help build a stronger body of evidence for the health benefits of physical activity.

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Jessica Gugusheff, Bridget C. Foley, Katherine B. Owen, Bradley Drayton, Ding Ding, Emmanuel Stamatakis, Charlotte Lund Rasmussen, Adrian E. Bauman and Margaret Thomas

Background: A combination of walking, other moderate physical activity, and vigorous physical activity is recommended for achieving good health. Vigorous activity has unique health benefits but may be less accessible to disadvantaged people. To reduce health inequity, we need to understand the differences in physical activity participation among socioeconomic subgroups and whether this is changing over time. Methods: Data from the 2002 to 2015 Adult New South Wales Population Health Surveys (164,652 responses) were analyzed to investigate trends in walking, moderate and vigorous physical activity participation by socioeconomic status as measured by educational attainment. Analysis used age- and sex-adjusted multivariable linear models that accounted for complex survey design. Results: In 2002, the highest socioeconomic group spent 18.5 (95% confidence interval, 8.2–28.8) minutes per week more than the lowest socioeconomic group being vigorously active. By 2015, this gap had steadily increased to 41.4 (95% confidence interval, 27.6–55.1) minutes per week. Inequity between groups was also found for duration of moderate activity but not for time spent walking. Conclusions: Low participation in vigorous activity in the lowest socioeconomic group is likely driving increasing inequities in physical activity and widening participation gaps over time. Barriers preventing the most disadvantaged people in New South Wales from engaging in vigorous activity should be addressed urgently.

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Ding Ding, James F. Sallis, Gregory J. Norman, Lawrence D. Frank, Brian E. Saelens, Jacqueline Kerr, Terry L. Conway, Kelli Cain, Melbourne F. Hovell, C. Richard Hofstetter and Abby C. King

Some attributes of neighborhood environments are associated with physical activity among older adults. This study examined whether the associations were moderated by driving status. Older adults from neighborhoods differing in walkability and income completed written surveys and wore accelerometers (N = 880, mean age = 75 years, 56% women). Neighborhood environments were measured by geographic information systems and validated questionnaires. Driving status was defined on the basis of a driver’s license, car ownership, and feeling comfortable to drive. Outcome variables included accelerometer-based physical activity and self-reported transport and leisure walking. Multilevel generalized linear regression was used. There was no significant Neighborhood Attribute × Driving Status interaction with objective physical activity or reported transport walking. For leisure walking, almost all environmental attributes were positive and significant among driving older adults but not among nondriving older adults (five significant interactions at p < .05). The findings suggest that driving status is likely to moderate the association between neighborhood environments and older adults’ leisure walking.