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  • Author: Eduardo Talavera x
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David Barranco-Gil, Jaime Gil-Cabrera, Pedro L. Valenzuela, Lidia B. Alejo, Almudena Montalvo-Pérez, Eduardo Talavera, Susana Moral-González and Alejandro Lucia

Purpose: The functional threshold power (FTP), which demarcates the transition from steady state to non-steady-state oxidative metabolism, is usually determined with a 20-minute cycling time trial that follows a standard ∼45-minute warm-up. This study aimed to determine if the standard warm-up inherent to FTP determination is actually necessary and how its modification or removal affects the relationship between FTP and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Methods: A total of 15 male cyclists (age 35 [9] y, maximum oxygen uptake 66.4 [6.8] mL·kg−1·min−1) participated in this randomized, crossover study. Participants performed a ramp test for determination of RCP and maximum oxygen uptake. During subsequent visits, they performed a 20-minute time trial preceded by the “standard” warm-up that is typically performed before an FTP test (S-WU), a 10-minute warm-up at the power output (PO) corresponding to 60% of maximum oxygen uptake (60%-WU), or no warm-up (No-WU). FTP was computed as 95% of the mean PO attained during the time trial. Results: Although the FTP was correlated with the RCP independently of the warm-up (r = .89, .93, and .86 for No-WU, 60%-WU, and S-WU, respectively; all Ps < .001), the PO at RCP was higher than the FTP in all cases (bias ± 95% limits of agreement = 57 [24], 60 [23], and 57 [32] W for No-WU, 60%-WU, and S-WU, respectively; all Ps < .001 and effect size > 1.70). Conclusions: The FTP is highly correlated with the RCP but corresponds to a significantly lower PO, being these results independent of the warm-up performed (or even with no warm-up).

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David Barranco-Gil, Lidia B. Alejo, Pedro L. Valenzuela, Jaime Gil-Cabrera, Almudena Montalvo-Pérez, Eduardo Talavera, Susana Moral-González, Vicente J. Clemente-Suárez and Alejandro Lucia

Purpose: To analyze the effects of different warm-up protocols on endurance-cycling performance from an integrative perspective (by assessing perceptual, neuromuscular, physiological, and metabolic variables). Methods: Following a randomized crossover design, 15 male cyclists (35 [9] y; peak oxygen uptake [VO2peak] 66.4 [6.8] mL·kg−1·min−1) performed a 20-minute cycling time trial (TT) preceded by no warm-up, a standard warm-up (10 min at 60% of VO2peak), or a warm-up that was intended to induce potentiation postactivation (PAP warm-up; 5 min at 60% of VO2peak followed by three 10-s all-out sprints). Study outcomes were jumping ability and heart-rate variability (both assessed at baseline and before the TT), TT performance (mean power output), and perceptual (rating of perceived exertion) and physiological (oxygen uptake, muscle oxygenation, heart-rate variability, blood lactate, and thigh skin temperature) responses during and after the TT. Results: Both standard and PAP warm-up (9.7% [4.7%] and 12.9% [6.5%], respectively, P < .001), but not no warm-up (−0.9% [4.8%], P = .074), increased jumping ability and decreased heart-rate variability (−7.9% [14.2%], P = .027; −20.3% [24.7%], P = .006; and −1.7% [10.5%], P = .366). Participants started the TT (minutes 0–3) at a higher power output and oxygen uptake after PAP warm-up compared with the other 2 protocols (P < .05), but no between-conditions differences were found overall for the remainder of outcomes (P > .05). Conclusions: Compared with no warm-up, warming up enhanced jumping performance and sympathetic modulation before the TT, and the inclusion of brief sprints resulted in a higher initial power output during the TT. However, no warm-up benefits were found for overall TT performance or for perceptual or physiological responses during the TT.