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  • Author: Ellen J. Staurowsky x
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Ellen J. Staurowsky

Using a critical theory approach, this paper examines how perceptions of historical accuracy impact on the legitimation of the Cleveland Indians’ claim that the Native imagery used in the promotion of the franchise was chosen to honor the first Native American to play in the major leagues, Louis Francis Sockalexis. An analysis was conducted of data gathered from Cleveland’s own account of the naming of the franchise along with past and present renderings and antecedents of the story as they appear in a variety of publications and media sources over a 100-year time period beginning in 1897 and ending in 1997. In light of the findings, Cleveland’s professed organizational intent to honor Sockalexis was tested and found to be based on faulty information. The implications of this discovery are addressed.

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Ellen J. Staurowsky

In this study, demographic characteristics and donor motivation profiles of donors to a Division I and a Division III men's athletic support group and a Division I and a Division III women's athletic support group (N = 20l )were compared. Demographic characteristics and donor motivation factors were measured by the Athletic Contributions Questionnaire Revised Edition-II (AC-QUIRE-II). Chi-square tests for two independent samples were used along with SPSS-X Crosstabs procedures to test the differences in demographic variables between the donors to men's and women's athletic support groups and female and male donors. Multivariate analyses of variance with follow up univariate F-tests were used to examine differences in donor motivation on the basis of gender of the donor and gender of the recipient. Based on the findings from this study, a preliminary profile suggests that female athletic donors are younger than their male counterparts, contribute at lower donation levels, are more inclined to give to women's programs, and are motivated by success and philanthropic factors.

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Ellen J. Staurowsky

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Ellen J. Staurowsky

The purpose of this paper is to trace the tangled web of relationships between and among European-American notions of property, individual and group possessory rights, and the role societal institutions play in promoting the exploitation of American Indian culture and people through the misappropriation of “Indianness” by sport teams. The analysis progresses from a discussion about the racial “invisibilities” of “Indianness” and “Whiteness” that are infused in these images and ultimately how these images are expressions of a “possessive investment in Whiteness” to a discussion delineating the property dimensions of this imagery and concludes with an examination of the mechanisms in place that leach children to become misappropriators.

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Ellen J. Staurowsky

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Ellen J. Staurowsky

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Edited by Ellen J. Staurowsky