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Sanna M. Nordin-Bates, Andrew P. Hill, Jennifer Cumming, Imogen J. Aujla and Emma Redding

The present study examined the relationship between dance-related perfectionism and perceptions of motivational climate in dance over time. In doing so, three possibilities were tested: (a) perfectionism affects perceptions of the motivational climate, (b) perceptions of the motivational climate affect perfectionism, and (c) the relationship is reciprocal. Two hundred seventy-one young dancers (M = 14.21 years old, SD = 1.96) from UK Centres for Advanced Training completed questionnaires twice, approximately 6 months apart. Cross-lagged analysis indicated that perfectionistic concerns led to increased perceptions of an ego-involving climate and decreased perceptions of a task-involving climate over time. In addition, perceptions of a task-involving climate led to increased perfectionistic strivings over time. The findings suggest that perfectionistic concerns may color perceptions of training/performing environments so that mistakes are deemed unacceptable and only superior performance is valued. They also suggest that perceptions of a task-involving climate in training/performing environments may encourage striving for excellence and perfection without promoting excessive concerns regarding their attainment.

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Teri Riding McCabe, Jatin P. Ambegaonkar, Matthew Wyon and Emma Redding

Context:

The female dancer’s technique in DanceSport involves keeping the upper body and head poised in extension and left rotation. Attempting to maintain this position while dancing can lead to an extension neck injury (ENI).

Objective:

The aim of this online survey was to discover the prevalence of ENI among female ballroom dancers.

Design and Participants:

Female DanceSport competitors (N = 127) completed an online survey.

Results:

Twenty-fve percent reported having ENI, and 68% of ENI occurred at competitions. Younger dancers (mean age = 20 ± 4.8 years) were significantly (p < .003) more likely to have ENI than older dancers (mean age = 34 ± 12.9 years).

Conclusions:

ENI is prevalent in DanceSport competitors. Dance medicine professionals should consider this when designing injury prevention programs.